Beech King Air 90

Beech King Air 90 Non-Fatal Byron, CA July 23, 2016

Posted by on Jul 23, 2016 in 2016, Beech King Air 90, Byron, CA, Loss of Aircraft Control, Non-Fatal Multi-Engine | 0 comments

On July 23, 2016, about 1900 Pacific daylight time, a Beech 65- A90, N256TA, sustained substantial damage following a reported loss of control while climbing out near the Byron Airport (C83) Byron, California. The airplane was registered to N80896 LLC, and operated by Bay Area Skydiving under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The commercial pilot and the 14 passengers were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the skydiving flight. The local flight departed C83 at about 1845.

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Beech King Air 90 Non-Fatal Longmont, CO June 27, 2016

Posted by on Jun 27, 2016 in 2016, Beech King Air 90, CO, Longmont, Non-Fatal Multi-Engine, Tail Strike | 0 comments

On June 27, 2016, about 1400 mountain daylight time, a Beech E-90 King Air airplane, N92DV, was struck by a skydiver exiting the airplane near Longmont, Colorado. The commercial rated pilot and fourteen skydivers were not injured and one skydiver sustained serious injuries. The airplane sustained substantial damage.

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King Air E90 Fatal (1) Karnack, TX July 7, 2012

Posted by on Jul 7, 2012 in 1, 2012, Beech King Air 90, Fatal, Fatal Multi-Engine, Ferry, Karnack, TX | 0 comments

Before the flight, the pilot did not obtain a weather briefing and departed without approval from company personnel. The airplane departed the airport about 0230 and climbed to 14,500 feet mean sea level. The pilot obtained visual flight rules (VFR) flight following services from air traffic control (ATC) personnel during the flight. While the airplane was en route, ATC personnel advised the pilot that an area of moderate precipitation was located about 15 miles ahead along the airplane’s flight path.

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King Air B90 Non-Fatal Hillsboro, TX September 17, 2011

Posted by on Sep 17, 2011 in 2011, Beech King Air 90, Hillsboro, Loss of Aircraft Control, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Multi-Engine, TX | 0 comments

While landing, the airplane touched down short of the runway, the left main landing gear impacted the edge of the runway and collapsed, and the airplane departed the edge of the runway into a culvert. The airplane’s left wing sustained substantial damage.

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King Air 90 Non-Fatal DeKalb, IL March 2, 2010

Posted by on Mar 2, 2010 in 2010, Beech King Air 90, Dekalb, IL, Improper/Poor Maintenance, Maintenance Flight, Mechanical Failure, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Multi-Engine | 0 comments

The Beech King Air had undergone maintenance that included a landing gear disassembly and inspection in preparation for the airplane’s sale. Following the landing gear inspection, the left main landing gear strut was overfilled to an extension that exceeded maintenance specifications due to the strut not being able to maintain the manufacturer’s specified pressure/extension.

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B- 90 King Air Fatal (1) West Point, VA August 1, 2009

Posted by on Aug 1, 2009 in 1, 2009, Beech King Air 90, Fatal, Fatal Multi-Engine, Tail Strike, VA, West Point | 0 comments

During a skydiving flight at approximately 14,000 feet, an instructor positioned himself at the door opening with his jump student nearby. The student inadvertently pulled the instructor’s reserve parachute D-ring, deploying the chute and pulling the instructor out of the airplane

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B-90 King Air Non-Fatal Wallkill, NY July 27, 2007

Posted by on Jul 27, 2007 in 2007, Beech King Air 90, Loss of Aircraft Control, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Multi-Engine, NY, Walkill | 0 comments

Following an uneventful flight, the pilot overflew the destination airport and observed no apparent wind speed or direction on the windsock. The airplane approached the runway fast, and landed “very hard,” separating the right main landing gear from the airplane in the process.

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B-90 Non-Fatal Louisburg, NC July 8, 2007

Posted by on Jul 8, 2007 in 2007, Beech King Air 90, Louisburg, NC, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Multi-Engine, Tail Strike | 0 comments

The pilot began descending when he thought all jumpers had departed the airplane, but 1 jumper remained. The remaining jumper realized the airplane was descending but was too late to stop his exit. After exiting the airplane he contacted the horizontal stabilizer and broke the femur of his left leg.

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Beech 65-A90 King Air Non-Fatal Fentress, TX October 17, 2003

Posted by on Oct 17, 2003 in 2003, Beech King Air 90, Fentress, Mechanical Failure, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Multi-Engine, TX | 0 comments

The airplane lost engine power during descent. The 1,127-hour pilot elected to perform emergency engine out procedures and prepared for an emergency landing. After impact, the pilot observed the right engine nacelle engulfed in flames, which then spread to the fuselage. Review of the engine logbook revealed the engine was being operated in excess of 1,000 hours of the manufacturer’s recommended time between overhauls of 3,600 hours.

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B-90 King Air Fatal (9) Lake Point, UT January 14, 2001

Posted by on Jan 14, 2001 in 2001, 9, Beech King Air 90, Fatal, Fatal Multi-Engine, Ferry, UT | 0 comments

The pilot and eight parachutists were returning from a skydive meet. The pilot had obtained a weather briefing, which advised of instrument meteorological conditions at the destination, and filed a VFR flight plan, but it was never activated. Witnesses heard, but could not see, a twin engine turboprop pass over the airport, heading north out over the Great Salt Lake. They described the weather conditions as being a low ceiling with 1/4-mile visibility,

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Beech 65-A90 Non-Fatal Lake Wales, FL July 2, 2000

Posted by on Jul 2, 2000 in 2000, Beech King Air 90, Collisions Other, FL, Lake Wales, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Multi-Engine | 0 comments

After takeoff the pilot raised the landing gear and then had to take evasive action to the right to avoid a flock of birds. As he performed the evasive maneuver, he raised the flaps. The aircraft was slow, and he kept the nose down to build up speed for the climb. Just as he was to commence the climb, he caught a glimpse of a wire ahead. He pulled up rapidly, but contacted the wire with the right wing.

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B-90 King Air Non-Fatal St. George, SC Nov. 27, 1999

Posted by on Nov 27, 1999 in 1999, Beech King Air 90, Fuel Exhaustion, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Multi-Engine | 0 comments

The pilot stated that he was at 12,500 feet, preparing for a four-mile parachute jump run, when he had initial indications of a power/fuel problem. He said he told the skydivers to exit, then initiated a descending spiral to land, during which time the fuel flow became erratic. He said both engines ceased operating at 3,000 feet, and he did not account for the northwest wind, and crashed short of the runway.

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B-90 King Air Fatal (10) Marine City, MI July 31, 1999

Posted by on Jul 31, 1999 in 10, 1999, Beech King Air 90, Fatal, Fatal Multi-Engine, Loss of Aircraft Control | 2 comments

The airplane impacted the terrain approximately 2,065 feet south of the departure end of runway 22. Damage to the cockpit section of the wreckage indicated a nose down crush angle of approximately 80 degrees. The wreckage path was on a 208 degree heading, and the distance from the initial impact to the location of the empennage was about 142 feet. The cockpit and cabin were destroyed by post impact fire.

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B-90 King Air Fatal (1) Hawaii May 22, 1999

Posted by on May 22, 1999 in 1, 1999, Beech King Air 90, Fatal, Fatal Multi-Engine, Undetermined | 0 comments

Following the 12th sport parachute jump of the day, which occurred after sunset, ground witnesses observed the airplane descend into the ocean in a left wing low, nose down attitude. They did not hear the engines sputtering or popping, or see the airplane make any erratic movements during its descent.

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B-90 King Air Non-Fatal Longmont, CO Jan. 23, 1997

Posted by on Jan 23, 1997 in 1997, Beech King Air 90, Ferry, Fuel Exhaustion, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Multi-Engine | 0 comments

The pilot had made a refueling stop at Vandalia, Illinois. She did not observe the refueling process, but the FBO also operated a King Air and she felt he knew the proper procedure to follow. The airplane was reportedly serviced with 235 gallons of Jet-A fuel (total capacity is 384 gallons). The pilot flew between 7,500 and 10,500 feet.

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B-90 King Air Non-Fatal Orange, VA Nov. 16, 1996

Posted by on Nov 16, 1996 in 1996, Beech King Air 90, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Multi-Engine, Preflight | 0 comments

The pilot was taking off with 10 jumpers onboard. At the rotation speed of 100 knots, he used elevator trim to rotate the airplane, but it did not lift off the runway. He continued moving the trim wheel violently to pitch the nose up, and attempted to pull back on the yoke, but the airplane collided with rising terrain off the end of the runway.

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Beech 65-90 Non-Fatal San Diego, CA November 6, 1994

Posted by on Nov 6, 1994 in 1994, Beech King Air 90, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Multi-Engine, Tail Strike | 0 comments

The aircraft was damaged when a sport parachutist collided with the horizontal stabilizer while exiting the aircraft at 13,000 feet msl. According to statements from the pilots and other jumpers on board the aircraft, the injured jumper’s reserve parachute deployed as he exited the door. The parachute momentarily draped over the left leading edge of the horizontal stabilizer,

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Beech 90 Non-Fatal Waynesville, OH July 20, 1991

Posted by on Jul 20, 1991 in 1991, Beech King Air 90, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Multi-Engine, Tail Strike | 0 comments

As the jumpmaster and student jumper backed into the door of the airplane in preparation for a tandem jump, he had a uncommanded deployment of his reserve parachute, that dragged them out the door. The jumpers went under the left horizontal stabilizer while the canopy went over the top. After a few seconds, the parachute shroud lines cut through the horizontal stabilizer and deformed the left elevator Read the NTSB...

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