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2016 Collisions Other Non-Fatal Single-Engine PAC 750XL Training VA Warrenton

PAC-750 Non-Fatal Warrenton, VA September 9, 2016

The pilot reported that this was his third skydiving flight of the day and he performed a back taxi on the runway for takeoff. He further reported that as he rotated the airplane for takeoff, he heard a “steady” stall warning horn, the flight controls felt mushy, and the airplane would not climb. The pilot reported that he aborted the takeoff and applied max braking and reverse thrust, but the airplane overran the runway remaining. Subsequently, the landing gear collapsed and the airplane collided with a fence.

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2014 Mechanical Failure Non-Fatal Non-Fatal Single-Engine PAC 750XL VA Warrenton

PAC 750XL Non-Fatal Warrenton, VA May 09, 2014

On May 9, 2014, about 1400 eastern daylight time, a Pacific Aerospace Corp 750XL, N750SS, experienced a left main landing gear separation following a hard landing and subsequent go-around at Warrenton Air Park

 

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2011 C-182 Non-Fatal Non-Fatal Single-Engine Tail Strike VA Warrenton

C-182A Non-Fatal Warrenton, VA October 10, 2011

The pilot stated that he was descending the airplane from an altitude of 8,000 feet after releasing skydivers. During the descent, at an altitude of about 3,000 feet, the airplane’s door opened and contacted the underside of the wing. The pilot slowed the airplane and attempted to close the door but noticed that the door had warped and that the window was missing.

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2011 C-182 Mechanical Failure Non-Fatal Non-Fatal Single-Engine VA Warrenton

C-182F Non-Fatal Warrenton, VA June 23, 2011

According to the pilot, as he taxied the airplane to the runway for takeoff, the left main landing gear collapsed. Examination revealed that the left main landing gear had fractured and completely separated from the airplane about 6 inches outboard of its attachment point at the airframe.

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1 2009 Beech King Air 90 Fatal Fatal Multi-Engine Tail Strike VA West Point

B- 90 King Air Fatal (1) West Point, VA August 1, 2009

During a skydiving flight at approximately 14,000 feet, an instructor positioned himself at the door opening with his jump student nearby. The student inadvertently pulled the instructor’s reserve parachute D-ring, deploying the chute and pulling the instructor out of the airplane

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2009 Collisions Other DHC-6 Twin Otter Non-Fatal Non-Fatal Multi-Engine Orange VA

DHC-6 Non-Fatal Orange, VA June 13, 2009

The pilot stated that after the 20 skydivers left the airplane, he “descended and entered at a 45-degree angle for the downwind leg for landing on runway 08.” Once on the downwind leg of the traffic pattern, the pilot stated that the “windshield began fogging up.” The pilot decided to make a 360-degree turn to the right while he wiped the window with a rag.

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1 2004 Beech H50 Twin Bonanza Fatal Fatal Multi-Engine Hartwood Maintenance Flight VA

Beech H50 (Twin Bo) Fatal (1) Hartwood, VA October 17, 2004

The airplane had not been flown for about 5 years prior to the accident, and was undergoing maintenance in preparation of a ferry flight. A mechanic reported that he had asked the pilot to conduct some engine run-ups as close to full power as possible. The pilot taxied to runway 35, a 2,470 foot-long, 35 foot-wide, gravel and turf runway; where he performed two high speed engine run-ups.

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2002 C-182 Fuel Exhaustion Hartwood Non-Fatal Non-Fatal Single-Engine VA

C-182B Non-Fatal Hartwood, VA October 18, 2002

Approximately 1 hour into flight, the engine lost all power, and the pilot attempted a forced landing to a field. During the landing, the airplane struck a tree located at the approach end of the field. The pilot initially reported that he departed with 2 inches of fuel in each tank, with the intention of flying 1 hour.

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2002 C-182 Fuel Exhaustion Moneta Non-Fatal Non-Fatal Single-Engine VA

C-182C Non-Fatal Moneta, VA March 24, 2002

After releasing parachutists, the pilot planned to return to the airport. During the descent, about 2,500 feet msl, the engine began to lose power. The pilot thought that carburetor ice caused the power loss, and performed emergency procedures, which included the application of carburetor heat. The engine did not regain power, and the pilot planned an emergency landing to a field.

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