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2017 AL Ferry Fuel Exhaustion Harvest Non-Fatal Non-Fatal Single-Engine PAC 750XL Preflight

PAC 750 Non-Fatal Harvest, AL August 28, 2017

The pilot stated that as part of his preflight inspection of the airplane he visually verified each fuel tank was full, and the total usable fuel capacity was 221 gallons. After takeoff, the airplane climbed to the flight planned altitude of 8,000 ft mean sea level (msl), and proceeded towards the destination airport. When the flight was near the planned refueling location of the Rockwood Municipal Airport, Rockwood, Tennessee, the pilot verified that the airplane had an adequate supply of fuel to reach the intended destination. While in contact with HSV air traffic control tower, he requested to descend to 6,000 ft msl, and was subsequently cleared to descend to 4,000 ft msl. At that time, the pilot noted HSV was to his left about 10 miles away. Shortly thereafter, while at an altitude about 3,500 ft msl, warning lights on the annunciator panel, which included a fuel pressure light, illuminated. The pilot declared an emergency with the controller, and the engine experienced a total loss of engine power. According to a Federal Aviation Administration inspector, the controller vectored the pilot to Epps Airpark (00AL), a private airport located in Harvest, Alabama, but the pilot was unable to locate it.

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2015 Collisions Other DHC-6 Twin Otter Ferry FL Non-Fatal Non-Fatal Multi-Engine Preflight Sebastian

DHC-6 Non-Fatal Sebastian, FL February 9, 2015

On February 9, 2015 at 0615 eastern standard time, N30EA, a DH6 Twin Otter sustained substantial damage when it collided with N70EA, another DH6 Twin Otter, during engine start at the Sebastian Municipal Airport (X26), Sebastian, Florida. Neither the pilot on N30EA or N70EA were injured. Both airplanes were registered to and operated by Eagle Air Transport, Ottawa, Illinois. An instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the re-positioning flight that was destined for the Exuma International Airport (MYEF), George Town, Bahamas. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the positioning flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

Both airplanes were parked right next to each other, wing-tip to wing-tip. N30AE was parked on the right side of N70AE. The pilot of N30AE stated that she had just started the engines. When she advanced the throttles (one at a time) to bring the generators on-line, the airplane began to move forward. She said she tried to apply the brakes, but they were not working and she was unable to move the tiller, which was positioned all the way to the left. The pilot was unable to stop the airplane and it collided with N70AE.

The pilot of N70AE said that had not started the engines yet when N30AE struck his airplane.

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2007 C-182 GA Non-Fatal Non-Fatal Single-Engine Preflight St. Mary's

C-182B Non-Fatal St. Mary’s, GA April 14, 2007

The pilot stated she had been conducting parachute drop operations through out the day. The pilot departed on the last parachute drop flight at an undetermined time, completed the parachute drop, and descended with power on. The pilot did not apply carburetor heat during the descent because the carburetor heat control cable was stuck, and would not move for the last two days.

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2006 C-182 Coupland Non-Fatal Non-Fatal Single-Engine Preflight TX

C-182L Non-Fatal Coupland, TX June 19, 2006

The 568-hour commercial pilot was returning to a private airstrip for a night landing after releasing parachute jumpers. According to the Pilot/Operator Aircraft Accident Report (NTSB Form 6120.1/2) the aircraft’s landing light was inoperative so in an attempt to identify the unlit grass runway, the pilot flew over the area several times to try to find the airstrip.

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2006 C-207 Jean Non-Fatal Non-Fatal Single-Engine NV Preflight

C-207 Non-Fatal Jean, NV June 2, 2006

The airplane failed to gain altitude and settled into the ground during the takeoff initial climb. The firewall buckled during the ground contact. The pilot said that just after takeoff, the airspeed decreased to 60 knots and the airplane was 300 feet above ground level. He was unable to recover the airspeed and he touched down in a field.

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2005 Deland FL Non-Fatal Non-Fatal Single-Engine PC-6 Pilatus Porter Preflight

PC-6 Non-Fatal DeLand, FL October 3, 2005

The airline transport certificated pilot with 10 skydiving passengers began a takeoff in a tailwheel-equipped and turboprop powered airplane on a CFR Part 91 skydiving flight. As the airplane started its climb, the pitch angle of the nose of the airplane increased until the airplane appeared to stall about 50 to 100 feet agl. It descended and impacted the runway in a left wing, nose low attitude.

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2004 C-182 Duanesburg Non-Fatal Non-Fatal Single-Engine NY Preflight

C-182E Non-Fatal Duanesburg, NY November 24, 2004

The airplane departed about 1130, and the outside air temperature at 1145 was 39 degrees F. The outside air temperature at 0747 was 28 degrees F. The pilot did not preheat the engine, and had difficulty starting it. On the third attempt, the engine started. The pilot then taxied to the runway, performed a rolling run-up, and departed.

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1 2004 C-P206 Fatal Fatal Single-Engine FL Jacksonville Loss of Aircraft Control Preflight

C-P206 Fatal (1) Jacksonville, FL October 30, 2004

The pilot did not perform weight and balance calculations for the accident flight; though, postaccident calculations indicated that the airplane was under gross weight and the center of gravity was within limits. The pilot reported that he did not have any memory of the accident flight. The accident flight was the second flight of the day for the pilot and began immediately after landing from the previous skydive drop flight.

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2002 Boulder City C-182 Non-Fatal Non-Fatal Single-Engine NV Preflight

C-182P Non-Fatal Boulder City, NV May 7, 2002

The airplane initiated a forced landing after a partial loss of engine power during the takeoff initial climb. During the initial run-up the magneto check was not within acceptable limits; however, approximately 15 minutes later the pilot rechecked the magnetos and they were within acceptable limits. The pilot said he configured and checked the airplane prior to takeoff with 10 degrees of flaps and all gages “in the green.”

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2001 Decatur DHC-3 Single Otter Non-Fatal Non-Fatal Single-Engine Preflight TX

DHC-3 Non-Fatal Decatur, TX March 31, 2001

The pilot and 21 jumpers were aboard the airplane for the local skydiving flight. The airplane took off to the north on the wet grass runway. Jumpers reported that during the initial takeoff climb, the aircraft assumed a “very steep angle of attack,” and described the pilot “winding the wheel on the lower right side of the chair clockwise, frantically,” and “busy with a wheel between the seats.”

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1999 4 C-182 Fatal Fatal Single-Engine Preflight

C-182 Fatal (4) Paso Robles, CA June 19, 1999

The airplane quickly became airborne and started an extremely steep climb for several hundred feet, which was followed by an equally steep descent until the airplane collided with terrain. The airplane had just completed one jump flight, and a different pilot fueled the airplane in preparation for the accident flight. The airplane was configured with one seat on the left side for the pilot and a 2-inch pad with seat belts for up to four skydivers.

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1998 6 C-U206 Collisions Other Fatal Fatal Single-Engine Preflight

C-U206 Fatal (6) Grain Valley, MO March 21, 1998

The parachute jump flight’s airplane was at 3,700 feet MSL when the pilot cancelled the operation with the FAA approach controller without explanation. Witnesses observed the airplane trailing white and black smoke. One witness said he saw the airplane trailing black smoke with its engine making a banging sound. Three witnesses at the accident airport said the airplane had smoke and flames coming from the airplane’s cowl and along the windshield as it approached the airport.

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1998 C-182 Non-Fatal Non-Fatal Single-Engine Preflight

C-182 Non-Fatal East Moriches, NY Feb. 1, 1998

After three uneventful parachute drop flights with three or four jumpers each, the pilot landed and picked up two jumpers. During the next takeoff roll, the pilot aborted the takeoff and was unable to stop the airplane before it struck a fence at the end of the 2,200 foot asphalt runway. The pilot stated ‘everything was normal, except the plane didn’t lift off.’

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1996 Beech King Air 90 Non-Fatal Non-Fatal Multi-Engine Preflight

B-90 King Air Non-Fatal Orange, VA Nov. 16, 1996

The pilot was taking off with 10 jumpers onboard. At the rotation speed of 100 knots, he used elevator trim to rotate the airplane, but it did not lift off the runway. He continued moving the trim wheel violently to pitch the nose up, and attempted to pull back on the yoke, but the airplane collided with rising terrain off the end of the runway.

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1995 C-182 Non-Fatal Non-Fatal Single-Engine Preflight

C-182 Non-Fatal Lebanon, ME October 22, 1995

The recently employed pilot-in-command (PIC) had been given a 1-hour orientation flight by another pilot the morning of the accident. The airplane used was equipped with only one seat, and the PIC flew the airplane while the pilot who gave the orientation sat on the floor.

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1996 C-182 Non-Fatal Non-Fatal Single-Engine Preflight

C-182 Non-Fatal Hanover, PA Sept. 21, 1996

The pilot took off with four skydivers on board the airplane, and climbed to 10,000 feet. After the skydivers exited the airplane, the pilot returned to land at the departure airport. The pilot stated that after landing, the airplane impacted parked road grading equipment. He reported that it was a dark night and winds were calm when the accident occurred.

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1996 C-182 Non-Fatal Non-Fatal Single-Engine Preflight

C-182 Non-Fatal Mendota, CA June 22, 1996

The pilot carried four parachute jumpers aloft; one left the aircraft at 4,500 feet and the last three left at 12,000 feet. After all the jumpers had exited, the pilot decided to do a power off stall. He stated that he was ‘curious about the gliding abilities of the 182’ and pulled the mixture control to idle cutoff when the aircraft was over the airport at 11,500 feet.

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1996 Bell 206 Non-Fatal Preflight

Bell 206 Helicopter Non-Fatal Cushing, OK February 3, 1996

After one of a group of five parachutists decided not to jump from the helicopter, he failed to deactivate a safety device designed to open his reserve parachute at a preset altitude.

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12 1995 Beech 65 Queen Air Fatal Fatal Multi-Engine Preflight

Beech 65 Fatal (12) West Point, VA Sept. 10, 1995

The airplane was loaded with 10 sport parachutists and one pilot. Later, investigators calculated that the maximum gross weight was exceeded by 149.6 pounds, and the center of gravity was 2.87 inches aft of the aft limit. The cabin door had been removed for parachuting operations; however, an altered Flight Manual Supplement had been used as authority for the door removal.

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1995 C-182 Non-Fatal Non-Fatal Single-Engine Preflight

C-182 Non-Fatal Derby, KS July 15, 1995

The pilot reported that after the airplane reached an altitude of 10,500 feet msl, the skydivers exited the airplane. The pilot stated that he then began a wings-level, high-rate descent to stay clear of the drop zone. The mixture was at full rich and the carburetor heat was applied as he maintained 150 to 160 knots indicated airspeed.

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1995 C-180 Non-Fatal Non-Fatal Single-Engine Preflight

C-180 Non-Fatal Springdale, AR July 4, 1995

The pilot lost control of the tailwheel equipped airplane while attempting to land on runway 18 with a crosswind from 290 at 19 knots, gusting to 37. The airplane ground looped and the left wing spar was damaged when the wing impacted the ground.

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1994 C-182 Engine Failure Fuel Contamination NC Non-Fatal Non-Fatal Single-Engine Preflight Raeford

C-182 Non-Fatal Raeford, NC July 19, 1994

AFTER FUELING THE AIRCRAFT, THE PILOT OBSERVED ‘A LOT’ OF WATER IN THE FUEL, WHEN CHECKING THE SUMPS. HE SHOOK THE WINGS, AND AGAIN OBSERVED WATER. HE ALLOWED THE AIRCRAFT TO SIT FOR ABOUT AN HOUR, THEN HE CHECKED THE SUMPS AGAIN. HE DRAINED WATER UNTIL NO MORE WATER WAS OBSERVED. AT ABOUT 200 FEET AGL, DURING THE INITIAL CLIMB, THE ENGINE QUIT.

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1994 4 C-172 Fatal Fatal Single-Engine Preflight

C-172 Fatal (4) Tremont City, OH July 16, 1994

The pilot was asked by the airport manager to fly a parachute jump flight in a cessna 172. The manager suggested that the pilot make a soft field takeoff & climb straight out to gain altitude. Witnesses reported the takeoff and initial climb appeared normal, but at about 200′ agl, the airplane leveled off, then descended about 50′ and continued forward for a moment

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1994 Beech 45 (Beech 18 military) Non-Fatal Non-Fatal Multi-Engine Preflight

Beech 45 Non-Fatal Acampo, CA April 24, 1994

The pilot was conducting a local skydiving flight. During the climb, both engines began to operate intermittently. The pilot instructed the parachutists to bail out at 9,000 feet msl and returned to the airport. The pilot failed to use carburetor heat during the descent. The pilot applied power to both engines while on final approach, but got no response.

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1993 C-182 Non-Fatal Non-Fatal Single-Engine Preflight Training

C-182 Non-Fatal Tucson, AZ April 25, 1993

The pilots were completing a parachute/orientation flight. After the parachutists exited, the airplane, with the first pilot at the controls, returned to the airport, descending at the maximum descent rate. The second pilot, a company check pilot, reported that the first pilot touched down simultaneously on the nose and right main landing gears at a high airspeed. The airplane subsequently swerved to the left and struck a bush located about 150 feet from the runway centerline and nosed over.

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