C-182

C-182 Non-Fatal Hanson, MA August 27, 2018

Posted by on Aug 27, 2018 in 2018, C-182, Engine Failure, Hanson, MA, Non-Fatal Single-Engine | 0 comments

“According to the pilot, he started carrying skydivers several days before the accident after familiarizing himself with the airport and airplane. The accident occurred on the fourth flight of the day. Around 2,000 ft during the initial climb, the airplane experienced a radio failure and the pilot noted a slight change in engine sound. He consulted with one of the tandem skydivers and continued to climb to 7,500 ft to allow the two pairs of skydivers to jump, which he felt was the safest course of action.”

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C-182 Fatal (4) Swainsboro, GA August 25, 2018

Posted by on Aug 25, 2018 in 2018, 4, C-182, Fatal Single-Engine, GA, Swainsboro | 0 comments

“On August 25, 2018, about 1400 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 182A, N4785D, was destroyed after a collision with terrain at East Georgia Regional Airport (SBO), Swainsboro, Georgia. The commercial pilot and three passengers were fatally injured, while one passenger was seriously injured. The airplane was operated by The Jumping Place Skydiving Center as a skydiving flight conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the flight. The flight was originating at the time of the accident.”

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C-182 Non-Fatal Jacksonville, FL June 23, 2018

Posted by on Jun 23, 2018 in 2018, C-182, Engine Failure, FL, Jacksonville, Non-Fatal Single-Engine | 0 comments

On June 23, 2018, about 1440 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 182, N5682B, struck three vehicles following a complete loss of engine power and subsequent forced landing to a residential area about one mile east of Herlong Recreational Airport (HEG), Jacksonville, Florida. The commercial pilot was not injured. The airplane received substantial damage to the right elevator and the right wing. The airplane was registered to Jumpstart Skydiving LLC and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 skydiving flight. Visual meteorological conditions were reported in the area about the time of the accident and no flight plan was filed. The local flight originated from HEG at 1400.

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C-182 Non-Fatal Arecibo, Puerto Rico June 10, 2018

Posted by on Jun 10, 2018 in 2018, Aericibo, C-182, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, Puerto Rico | 0 comments

On June 10, 2018, about 1220 Atlantic standard time, a Cessna 182, N3889D, was substantially damaged during a forced landing after it experienced a total loss of engine power shortly after takeoff from the Antonio (Nery) Juarbe Pol Airport (ABO), Arecibo, Puerto Rico. The pilot was seriously injured, and the four passengers sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to an individual and operated by Skydive Puerto Rico as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 skydiving flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight that departed about 1218.

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C-182 Non-Fatal Luling, TX May 08, 2018

Posted by on May 8, 2018 in 2018, C-182, Engine Failure, Luling, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, TX | 0 comments

On May 8, 2018, about 1500 central daylight time, a Cessna 182F airplane, N3291U, impacted a field 0.3 miles southeast of the airport shortly after takeoff from The Carter Memorial Airport (T91), Luling, Texas. The commercial pilot and 2 passengers sustained minor injuries, and 2 passengers were not injured. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The skydiving flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) flight plan had been filed for the flight. The local flight was originating at the time of the accident.

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C182A Non-Fatal San Martin, CA June 24, 2017

Posted by on Jun 24, 2017 in 2017, C-182, CA, Fuel Exhaustion, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, San Martin | 0 comments

The pilot reported that he departed for a parachute jump flight with 12 gallons of fuel onboard. He added that, after the parachute jumpers exited the airplane about 10,500 ft mean sea level (msl), he initiated a left spiraling descent back to the airport. He further added that he “heard and felt the engine start [to] quiet down as if it was shutting down.” He then began to make right descending turns and verified that the fuel selector was in the “both” position. He added that the cylinder head temperature was decreasing, so he switched back to left descending turns and that the “fuel starvation due to banking happened two more times.”

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C-182A Non-Fatal Ellington, CT June 1, 2017

Posted by on Jun 1, 2017 in 2017, C-182, CT, Ellington, Loss of Aircraft Control, Non-Fatal Single-Engine | 0 comments

According to the pilot, he landed the airplane on the 1,800-ft-long asphalt runway in the rain at 70 mph with full flaps. He reported that, on final, he had considered conducting a go-around due to wind and weather, but “we were low, slow, and 130 pounds below maximum gross weight with very dynamic wind conditions at the time and …apartment buildings about 400 yards beyond the end of runway 19.” During the landing, he touched down with a right crosswind, about 600 ft beyond the runway threshold.

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C-182A Non-Fatal Ovid, NY April 23, 2017

Posted by on Apr 23, 2017 in 2017, C-182, Fuel Exhaustion, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, NY, Ovid | 0 comments

The pilot reported that on the morning of the flight he used a fuel dipstick to check fuel tank quantities prior to his flight. The fuel tank dipstick was marked in the number of skydiving flights and reserve fuel had a mark as well. The right tank showed a higher fuel quantity than the left and when combined, the stick showed enough fuel for three flight loads of jumpers. He further stated that he fueled the airplane up to the “four load” level five days prior to the accident flight, which was the last time the airplane was flown.

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C-182A Non-Fatal Seebring, OH January 22, 2017

Posted by on Jan 22, 2017 in 2017, C-182, Loss of Aircraft Control, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, OH, Seebring | 0 comments

The pilot in the tricycle-gear-equipped airplane reported that he landed about 4 ft short of the asphalt runway. The nose landing gear struck the 6-inch-high asphalt perimeter and separated from the airplane. The pilot aborted the landing, the airplane bounced, and the pilot established a climb. He completed one traffic pattern and an approach. During the second landing, the pilot chose to land on the turf safety area parallel to the runway. When the airplane’s main landing gear touched down on the turf surface, the airplane nosed over. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the firewall, fuselage, left wing, and empennage.

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C-182 Non-Fatal Kankakee, IL June 26, 2016

Posted by on Jun 26, 2016 in 2016, C-182, Engine Failure, IL, Kankakee, Non-Fatal Single-Engine | 0 comments

The commercial pilot reported that, after dropping off skydivers, he made a rapid spiraling descent back to the airport. The pilot added that, because the wind had changed such that it resulted in a tailwind, he initiated a go-around during the landing approach; however, when he advanced the throttle, the engine initially surged and then lost power. The pilot made a forced landing in a corn field near the end of the runway.
After the accident, the pilot drained about 7 gallons of fuel from the airplane. Fuel was present in the carburetor, but the gascolator bowl was empty. No other anomalies were noted. It is likely that the low level of fuel unported during the rapid spiraling descent, which led to the subsequent fuel starvation to the engine.

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C-182A Non-Fatal Reno, NV May 24, 2016

Posted by on May 24, 2016 in 2016, C-182, Fuel Exhaustion, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, NV, Reno | 0 comments

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, Aviation Safety Inspector that arrived at the scene shortly after the accident, he located the uninjured pilot in command (PIC) and a passenger rated pilot who were the only occupants of the airplane. The inspector reported that the PIC told him that he had fueled the airplane prior to the flight. The PIC told the inspector that he had flown 2.5 hours on the right tank which indicated 3.9 gallons of fuel remained per the electronic fuel quantity indicator, at which time he switched to the left tank which indicated 15 gallons of fuel remained per the electronic fuel quantity indicator.

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C-182H Fatal (5) Hanapepe, HI May 23, 2016

Posted by on May 23, 2016 in 2016, 5, C-182, Fatal Single-Engine, Hanapepe, HI | 0 comments

On May 23, 2016 about 0922 Hawaiian standard time, a Cessna 182H, N2007X, was destroyed when it impacted terrain shortly after departure from Port Allen (PAK), Hanapepe, Hawaii. The pilot and four passengers were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, D & J Air Adventures, Inc., as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 flight as a part of the skydiving flight operation. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and no flight plan filed. The local flight originated from PAK at about 0921.

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Cessna 182G Non-Fatal Salisbury, NC November 28, 2015

Posted by on Nov 28, 2015 in 2015, C-182, Loss of Aircraft Control, NC, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, Salisbury | 0 comments

According to the pilot of the tricycle landing gear equipped airplane, he was performing skydiving operations. He reported that he felt rushed in performing his assigned duties because, “the skydiving school kept wanting me to return quicker for the next load.”

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C-182A Fatal (1) Lexington, TX September 27, 2015

Posted by on Sep 27, 2015 in 1, 2015, C-182, Collisions Other, Fatal, Fatal Single-Engine, Lexington, Loss of Aircraft Control, TX | 0 comments

On September 27, 2015, about 1830 central daylight time, a Cessna 182A airplane, N3921D, was substantially damaged during an in-flight collision with trees and terrain near Lexington, Texas. The pilot sustained fatal injuries. The aircraft was registered to and operated by Austin Skydiving Center, Inc. under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a skydiving flight operation.

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C-182B Non-Fatal Fults, IL July 14, 2015

Posted by on Jul 14, 2015 in 2015, C-182, Festus, Fults, IL, Loss of Aircraft Control, Mechanical Failure, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine | 0 comments

On July 14, 2015 about 1456 central standard time, a Cessna 1959 year model 182B skydive equipped airplane, N2764G, registered to Cook Aviation of St. Louis, Missouri, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain after the pilot bailed out (via donned parachute) due to flight control problems.

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C-182D Non-Fatal Oak Harbor, WA June 29, 2015

Posted by on Jun 29, 2015 in 2015, C-182, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, Oak Harbor, WA | 0 comments

On June 29, 2015, about 0813 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 182D, N9980T, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing following a reported loss of engine power during an approach to landing at the AJ Eisenberg Airport (OKH) Oak Harbor, Washington. The airplane was registered to Sinclair Aviation LLC., and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The commercial pilot was seriously injured and the passenger sustained minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the skydiving flight. The local flight departed OKH at an undetermined time.

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C-182A Non-Fatal Moab, UT June 13, 2015

Posted by on Jun 13, 2015 in 2015, C-182, Engine Failure, Moab, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, UT | 2 comments

On June 13, 2015, about 1900 mountain daylight time, a Cessna 182A, N5143D, experienced a loss of engine power while on final approach to the Canyonlands Field Airport (CNY), Moab, Utah. The pilot subsequently made an off airport forced landing. The commercial pilot, the sole occupant, was not injured. The airplane was operated by Skydive Canyonlands under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a skydiving operation. The airplane sustained structural damage to the tail section of the airplane. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the local area flight, and a company flight plan had been filed. The flight was destined for CNY.

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C-182A Non-Fatal Bethany Center, NY September 20, 2014

Posted by on Sep 20, 2014 in 2014, Bethany Center, C-182, Ferry, Loss of Aircraft Control, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, NY | 0 comments

According to the pilot, he was attempting a soft field landing on runway 27. Following a stable approach and landing, a gust of wind was encountered. The airplane veered to the right and the pilot was unable to stop the airplane before the right wing struck a wind sock pole. An inspector from the Federal Aviation Administration examined the airplane and confirmed substantial damage to the right wing. The pilot reported no pre-impact mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

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