Fatal Multi-Engine

King Air E90 Fatal (1) Karnack, TX July 7, 2012

Posted by on Jul 7, 2012 in 1, 2012, Beech King Air 90, Fatal, Fatal Multi-Engine, Ferry, Karnack, TX | 0 comments

Before the flight, the pilot did not obtain a weather briefing and departed without approval from company personnel. The airplane departed the airport about 0230 and climbed to 14,500 feet mean sea level. The pilot obtained visual flight rules (VFR) flight following services from air traffic control (ATC) personnel during the flight. While the airplane was en route, ATC personnel advised the pilot that an area of moderate precipitation was located about 15 miles ahead along the airplaneā€™s flight path.

Read the NTSB report…

Read More

DHC-6 Fatal (2) Hampton, GA March 8, 2011

Posted by on Mar 8, 2011 in 2, 2011, DHC-6 Twin Otter, Fatal, Fatal Multi-Engine, GA, Hampton, Maintenance Flight | 0 comments

The airplane had not been flown for about 5 months and the purpose of the accident flight was a maintenance test flight after both engines had been replaced with higher horsepower models. Witnesses observed the airplane depart and complete two uneventful touch-and-go landings. The airplane was then observed to be struggling to gain altitude and airspeed while maneuvering in the traffic pattern.

Read the NTSB report…

Read More

B- 90 King Air Fatal (1) West Point, VA August 1, 2009

Posted by on Aug 1, 2009 in 1, 2009, Beech King Air 90, Fatal, Fatal Multi-Engine, Tail Strike, VA, West Point | 0 comments

During a skydiving flight at approximately 14,000 feet, an instructor positioned himself at the door opening with his jump student nearby. The student inadvertently pulled the instructor’s reserve parachute D-ring, deploying the chute and pulling the instructor out of the airplane

Read the NTSB report…

Read More

Beech 99 Fatal (1) Bowling Green, MO June 22, 2008

Posted by on Jun 22, 2008 in 1, 2008, Beech 99, Bowling Green, Fatal, Fatal Multi-Engine, MO, Tail Strike | 0 comments

The commercial pilot reported that he was en route to a parachutist jump zone on the first of two planned jumps. Prior to the first jump, before he had slowed the airplane, or illuminated the green jump light, indicating that the parachutists had permission to jump, two of the parachutists prematurely jumped.

Read the NTSB report…

Read More

DHC-6 Fatal (6) Sullivan, MO July 29, 2006

Posted by on Jul 29, 2006 in 2006, 6, DHC-6 Twin Otter, Fatal, Fatal Multi-Engine, Loss of Aircraft Control, Mechanical Failure, MO, Sullivan | 0 comments

On July 29, 2006, about 1345 central daylight time, a de Havilland DHC 6 100, N203E, registered to Adventure Aviation, LLC, and operated by Skydive Quantum Leap as a local parachute operations flight, crashed into trees and terrain after takeoff from Sullivan Regional Airport, near Sullivan, Missouri. The pilot and five parachutists were killed, and two parachutists were seriously injured.

Read the NTSB report…

Read More

DHC-6 Fatal (1) DeLand, FL April 23, 2005

Posted by on Apr 23, 2005 in 1, 2005, Collisions Other, Deland, DHC-6 Twin Otter, Fatal, Fatal Multi-Engine, FL | 0 comments

The pilot stated that after the 14 jumpers left the airplane at 13,500 feet, southwest of the airport, he started his descent to the northeast. He approached the airport from the northeast overflew the airport, and made a left turn to enter the downwind leg for runway 23. He saw some parachutes on the ground and some in the air.

Read the NTSB report…

Read More

Beech H50 (Twin Bo) Fatal (1) Hartwood, VA October 17, 2004

Posted by on Oct 17, 2004 in 1, 2004, Beech H50 Twin Bonanza, Fatal, Fatal Multi-Engine, Hartwood, Maintenance Flight, VA | 0 comments

The airplane had not been flown for about 5 years prior to the accident, and was undergoing maintenance in preparation of a ferry flight. A mechanic reported that he had asked the pilot to conduct some engine run-ups as close to full power as possible. The pilot taxied to runway 35, a 2,470 foot-long, 35 foot-wide, gravel and turf runway; where he performed two high speed engine run-ups.

Read the NTSB report…

Read More

DHC-6 Fatal (1) Fentress, TX May 27, 2001

Posted by on May 27, 2001 in 1, 2001, DHC-6 Twin Otter, Fatal, Fatal Multi-Engine, Fentress, Formation Flying, Mid Air, Prop Strike, TX | 0 comments

A de Havilland DHC-6 and a Beech King Air 90 were to make a formation air drop of skydivers from 14,000 feet msl. The de Havilland was to be the lead aircraft with the King Air in trail. As the skydivers prepared to exit, the King Air was traveling faster than the de Havilland, and the pilot of the King Air had to pitch up and bank right to avoid the de Havilland.

Read the NTSB report…

Read More

B-90 King Air Fatal (9) Lake Point, UT January 14, 2001

Posted by on Jan 14, 2001 in 2001, 9, Beech King Air 90, Fatal, Fatal Multi-Engine, Ferry, UT | 0 comments

The pilot and eight parachutists were returning from a skydive meet. The pilot had obtained a weather briefing, which advised of instrument meteorological conditions at the destination, and filed a VFR flight plan, but it was never activated. Witnesses heard, but could not see, a twin engine turboprop pass over the airport, heading north out over the Great Salt Lake. They described the weather conditions as being a low ceiling with 1/4-mile visibility,

Read the NTSB report…

Read More

DHC-6 Fatal (1) Raleigh, NC July 31, 2000

Posted by on Jul 31, 2000 in 1, 2000, DHC-6 Twin Otter, Fatal, Fatal Multi-Engine, Ferry, NC, Raleigh | 0 comments

The flight had proceeded without incident until a visual approach was made to the destination airport, but a landing was not completed because of poor visibility due to ground fog. The pilot then requested vectors to another airport, and was advised by ATC that he was below radar coverage, and he could not be radar identified. The pilot stated he would proceed to a third airport;

Read the NTSB report…

Read More

B-90 King Air Fatal (10) Marine City, MI July 31, 1999

Posted by on Jul 31, 1999 in 10, 1999, Beech King Air 90, Fatal, Fatal Multi-Engine, Loss of Aircraft Control | 2 comments

The airplane impacted the terrain approximately 2,065 feet south of the departure end of runway 22. Damage to the cockpit section of the wreckage indicated a nose down crush angle of approximately 80 degrees. The wreckage path was on a 208 degree heading, and the distance from the initial impact to the location of the empennage was about 142 feet. The cockpit and cabin were destroyed by post impact fire.

Read the NTSB report…

Read More

B-90 King Air Fatal (1) Hawaii May 22, 1999

Posted by on May 22, 1999 in 1, 1999, Beech King Air 90, Fatal, Fatal Multi-Engine, Undetermined | 0 comments

Following the 12th sport parachute jump of the day, which occurred after sunset, ground witnesses observed the airplane descend into the ocean in a left wing low, nose down attitude. They did not hear the engines sputtering or popping, or see the airplane make any erratic movements during its descent.

Read the NTSB report…

Read More

Beech 65 Fatal (12) West Point, VA Sept. 10, 1995

Posted by on Sep 10, 1995 in 12, 1995, Beech 65 Queen Air, Fatal, Fatal Multi-Engine, Preflight | 0 comments

The airplane was loaded with 10 sport parachutists and one pilot. Later, investigators calculated that the maximum gross weight was exceeded by 149.6 pounds, and the center of gravity was 2.87 inches aft of the aft limit. The cabin door had been removed for parachuting operations; however, an altered Flight Manual Supplement had been used as authority for the door removal.

Read the NTSB report…

Read More

Beech C-45 Fatal (12) Hinckley, IL Sept. 7, 1992

Posted by on Sep 7, 1992 in 12, 1992, Beech 45 (Beech 18 military), Fatal, Fatal Multi-Engine, Improper/Poor Maintenance, Loss of Aircraft Control | 0 comments

After takeoff, the airplane was seen at low altitude trailing smoke from the left engine. Witnesses saw the wings ‘tipping’ back and forth, then a wing dropped and hit the ground. Examination revealed that a supercharger bearing had failed in the left engine. The left engine had been recently installed by non-certificated personnel after being inactive for 18 yrs without preservation.

Read the NTSB report…

Read More