C-U206

C-U206 Non-Fatal Diamond Point, NY May 17, 2017

Posted by on May 17, 2017 in 2017, C-U206, Collisions Other, Diamond Point, Loss of Aircraft Control, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, NY | 0 comments

The pilot reported that, during the takeoff roll, the airplane encountered a gust of wind and veered left off the runway centerline. He added, that the airplane became airborne, but that he did not have “enough time” to avoid a parked helicopter. Subsequently, the left wing impacted the helicopter. He then reduced the engine power and the airplane landed without further incident.

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C-U206 Non-Fatal Skiatook, OK August 13, 2016

Posted by on Aug 13, 2016 in 2016, C-206 Turbo-Charged, C-U206, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, OK, Skiatook | 0 comments

On August 13, 2016, about 1100 central standard time, a Cessna TU206B airdrop configured airplane, N29225, registered to the pilot and operated by Gypsy Moth Skydive LLC of Benton, Kansas, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing after a loss of engine power while maneuvering in the vicinity of Skiatook, Oklahoma. All seven occupants, the private pilot and six passengers (parachutists), sustained minor injuries.

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C-U206 Non-Fatal Titusville, FL August 9, 2015

Posted by on Aug 9, 2015 in 2015, C-U206, FL, Loss of Aircraft Control, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, Titusville | 1 comment

The pilot stated that he was conducting a skydiver “jump run”, and prior to letting the skydivers out the radio squelch interrupter failed causing a constant static noise. After letting the skydivers out over the airport the pilot set up the descent based on the winds acquired for the previous landing on runway 22. As he circled for landing the manifold pressure indication “dropped off” to zero.

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C-206 Fatal (5) Caboolture, Australia March 22, 2014

Posted by on Mar 22, 2014 in 2014, 5, C-U206, Fatal, Fatal Single-Engine | 1 comment

BRISBANE : A light aircraft used for skydiving crashed in an airfield in eastern Australia on Saturday and burst into flames, killing all five people on board, police said. The plane veered left shortly after taking off from the Caboolture airstrip, 50 kms north of Brisbane on Australia’s east coast, before plunging to the ground.

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C-U206 Non-Fatal Winterset, IA April 1, 2012

Posted by on Apr 1, 2012 in 2012, C-U206, IA, Mechanical Failure, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, Winterset | 0 comments

The pilot stated that he departed the airport with six parachutists for a jump flight. As the airplane approached 1,000 feet above ground level, he noticed that the airplane wasn’t climbing. He checked the engine gauges and noticed that the engine analyzer was flashing “CHT” and the cylinder head temperature was 454 degrees F. As the pilot pitched the nose down and turned back to the airport, he heard a muffled “thud” sound and saw white smoke pour from the engine.

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C-TU206 Non-Fatal Buckeye, AZ October 19, 2008

Posted by on Oct 19, 2008 in 2008, AZ, Buckeye, C-206 Turbo-Charged, C-U206, Collisions Other, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine | 0 comments

The pilot of a Piper L-4 airplane reported that shortly after he started the taxi roll from the parking area, he initiated a shallow turn toward the taxiway. As he reached the taxiway he steered to follow the centerline, however, the airplane continued to turn to the right. He reported, in part, that the left brake inputs were not responsive and the airplane continued to the right and collided with a standing occupied Cessna.

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C-TU206 Non-Fatal Jeanerette, LA Oct. 23, 1999

Posted by on Oct 23, 1999 in 1999, C-206 Turbo-Charged, C-U206, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, Undetermined | 0 comments

The pilot stated that while descending through 6,000 feet msl, the engine lost power. The pilot reported that when he enriched the mixture, the engine regained power. He stated that he left the mixture full rich; however, when the airplane was at 600 feet and turning to base, the engine lost power again.

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C-U206 Fatal (6) Grain Valley, MO March 21, 1998

Posted by on Mar 21, 1998 in 1998, 6, C-U206, Collisions Other, Fatal, Fatal Single-Engine, Preflight | 0 comments

The parachute jump flight’s airplane was at 3,700 feet MSL when the pilot cancelled the operation with the FAA approach controller without explanation. Witnesses observed the airplane trailing white and black smoke. One witness said he saw the airplane trailing black smoke with its engine making a banging sound. Three witnesses at the accident airport said the airplane had smoke and flames coming from the airplane’s cowl and along the windshield as it approached the airport.

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C-TU206 Non-Fatal Loveland, CO February 21, 1988

Posted by on Feb 21, 1988 in 1988, C-206 Turbo-Charged, C-U206, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, Tail Strike | 0 comments

A commercial plt was flying a group of parachutists for a skydiving club. The aircraft encountered turbulence during a climb to 4,500 feet agl. As the second jumper was exiting, the aircraft dropped and the parachutist struck the horizontal stabilizer. The outer four inches were bent downward and the assembly was pulled one inch from the fuselage. The plt made a normal landing and an inspection revealed some bulkhead damage in the tail section. The parachutist was not injured. Read the NTSB...

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C-TU206 Fatal (2) Mead, WA May 19, 1986

Posted by on May 19, 1986 in 1986, 2, C-206 Turbo-Charged, C-U206, Collisions Other, Fatal, Fatal Single-Engine | 0 comments

Both acft were operating in vfr conditions modified by slight haze, high overcast and low sun angle near airport. N6161m was performing lazy eight maneuvers in a normal practice area two miles east of airport; n8267q was in clockwise orbital descent for landing following a parachute jump plane. Radar data and witness informtion show that on east side of airport, n8267q deviated from orbit and proceeded southeast as n6161m completed north end of figure eight in right turn away from airport and proceeded south. Acft converged at about 30 degree closing angle with n6161m climbing and n8267q descending and collided at about 2500 ft agl. Read the NTSB...

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