Mechanical Failure

C-182B Non-Fatal Fults, IL July 14, 2015

Posted by on Jul 14, 2015 in 2015, C-182, Festus, Fults, IL, Loss of Aircraft Control, Mechanical Failure, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine | 0 comments

On July 14, 2015 about 1456 central standard time, a Cessna 1959 year model 182B skydive equipped airplane, N2764G, registered to Cook Aviation of St. Louis, Missouri, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain after the pilot bailed out (via donned parachute) due to flight control problems.

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C-TP206 Non-Fatal Sturgeon Bay, WI June 1, 2013

Posted by on Jun 1, 2013 in 2013, C-206 Turbo-Charged, C-P206, Fuel Starvation, Mechanical Failure, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, Sturgeon Bay, WI | 0 comments

The airplane experienced a total loss of engine power during a skydiving flight. After the pilot switched the fuel tank selector from the left fuel tank to the right fuel tank position, the engine restarted. The pilot continued the flight. While returning to the departure airport and preparing for landing, the pilot switched the fuel tank selector back to the left fuel tank position because the fuel gauge indicated a greater fuel quantity.

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C-U206 Non-Fatal Winterset, IA April 1, 2012

Posted by on Apr 1, 2012 in 2012, C-U206, IA, Mechanical Failure, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, Winterset | 0 comments

The pilot stated that he departed the airport with six parachutists for a jump flight. As the airplane approached 1,000 feet above ground level, he noticed that the airplane wasn’t climbing. He checked the engine gauges and noticed that the engine analyzer was flashing “CHT” and the cylinder head temperature was 454 degrees F. As the pilot pitched the nose down and turned back to the airport, he heard a muffled “thud” sound and saw white smoke pour from the engine.

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C-205 Non-Fatal Lake Wales, FL March 31, 2012

Posted by on Mar 31, 2012 in 2012, C-205, FL, Fuel Starvation, Lake Wales, Mechanical Failure, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine | 0 comments

The pilot said that he normally flew the airplane with the fuel selector positioned to the right main fuel tank during skydiving operations. However, on the day of the accident, maintenance was performed on the airplane, and three engine run-ups were performed using the left main fuel tank.

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C-182F Non-Fatal Warrenton, VA June 23, 2011

Posted by on Jun 23, 2011 in 2011, C-182, Mechanical Failure, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, VA, Warrenton | 0 comments

According to the pilot, as he taxied the airplane to the runway for takeoff, the left main landing gear collapsed. Examination revealed that the left main landing gear had fractured and completely separated from the airplane about 6 inches outboard of its attachment point at the airframe.

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Beech 99 Non-Fatal Cedartown, GA April 10, 2011

Posted by on Apr 10, 2011 in 2011, Beech 99, Cedartown, GA, Mechanical Failure, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Multi-Engine | 0 comments

The pilot received an unsafe landing gear indication for the left main landing gear when he configured the airplane for landing. He cycled the gear and then attempted a manual extension, both without success. The pilot then completed the landing on the nose and right main landing gear. A post accident examination of the left main landing gear actuator revealed that the supports for the actuator bearings lacked lubrication and that the bearings displayed wear due to inadequate lubrication.

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C-182C Fatal (3) Crowley, LA December 18, 2010

Posted by on Dec 18, 2010 in 2010, 3, C-182, Crowley, Fatal, Fatal Single-Engine, LA, Mechanical Failure | 0 comments

The flight departed to the east with four skydivers for a local jump. One witness stated that, immediately following the takeoff, about 200 feet above ground level, a “percussive” pop from the engine was heard. Two witnesses stated that the right wing dropped, and the airplane impacted the ground.

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C-182G Non-Fatal Mount Vernon, MO March 18, 2010

Posted by on Mar 18, 2010 in 2010, C-182, Mechanical Failure, MO, Mount Vernon, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine | 0 comments

During flight at 10,000 feet above ground level, the engine began to vibrate and run rough. Shortly thereafter, a loud bang occurred and oil was present on the windscreen. The pilot attempted a forced landing, and during the forced landing, the airplane landed short of the runway and impacted a ditch.

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King Air 90 Non-Fatal DeKalb, IL March 2, 2010

Posted by on Mar 2, 2010 in 2010, Beech King Air 90, Dekalb, IL, Improper/Poor Maintenance, Maintenance Flight, Mechanical Failure, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Multi-Engine | 0 comments

The Beech King Air had undergone maintenance that included a landing gear disassembly and inspection in preparation for the airplane’s sale. Following the landing gear inspection, the left main landing gear strut was overfilled to an extension that exceeded maintenance specifications due to the strut not being able to maintain the manufacturer’s specified pressure/extension.

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C-182H Non-Fatal Weeping Water, NE August 22, 2009

Posted by on Aug 22, 2009 in 2009, C-182, Mechanical Failure, NE, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, Weeping Water | 0 comments

The pilot was departing from a soft, dry, 2,200-foot turf airfield using soft/short field procedures. After becoming airborne, the airplane settled back onto the runway, became airborne, and settled onto the runway a second time. At this time the right main wheel separated and the landing gear strut dug into the terrain spinning the airplane around and bringing it to an abrupt stop.

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C-182 Non-Fatal Kalispell, MT April 4, 2009

Posted by on Apr 4, 2009 in 2009, C-182, Kalispell, Mechanical Failure, MT, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine | 0 comments

The airplane used for the skydiving operation was equipped with a foot step just above the right wheel, which the skydivers used to launch from the airplane. As the last of four skydivers stepped on the foot step, the right main landing gear fell away. The pilot reported that after he flew around for about 1 1/2 hours to burn off fuel, he intended to perform a low pass over the runway before coming around to land.

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C-182D Non-Fatal Orange Grove, TX September 5, 2008

Posted by on Sep 5, 2008 in 2008, C-182, Mechanical Failure, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, Orange Grove, TX |

The private pilot stated that he was at an altitude of 3,500 feet when the engine stopped producing power. He made a forced landing to field and struck a cedar post with the airplane’s nose wheel and subsequently flipped over resulting in structural damage to the vertical stabilizer

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DHC-6 Non-Fatal Baldwin, WI June 29, 2008

Posted by on Jun 29, 2008 in 2008, Baldwin, DHC-6 Twin Otter, Mechanical Failure, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Multi-Engine, WI | 0 comments

The pilot reported that there were no observed anomalies with the left wing prior to the flight. During the flight, which was conducted as a local parachute operation, the pilot performed a descending turn. The left wing’s aileron bound when the pilot attempted to level the bank. The pilot declared an emergency.

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C-208 Non-Fatal Greensburg, IN June 01, 2008

Posted by on Jun 1, 2008 in 2008, C-208 Caravan, Greensburg, IN, Mechanical Failure, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine | 0 comments

The pilot reported that the airplane, which was used for sky diving operations, was climbing through 7,000 feet mean sea level (msl) when he heard an explosion followed by a metal grinding noise coming from the engine section of the airplane. He felt the airplane vibrate, and smoke began to fill the cabin. He reported that the engine was not producing any power so he shut the fuel off and performed procedures to rid the cabin of smoke.

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DHC-6 Fatal (6) Sullivan, MO July 29, 2006

Posted by on Jul 29, 2006 in 2006, 6, DHC-6 Twin Otter, Fatal, Fatal Multi-Engine, Loss of Aircraft Control, Mechanical Failure, MO, Sullivan | 0 comments

On July 29, 2006, about 1345 central daylight time, a de Havilland DHC 6 100, N203E, registered to Adventure Aviation, LLC, and operated by Skydive Quantum Leap as a local parachute operations flight, crashed into trees and terrain after takeoff from Sullivan Regional Airport, near Sullivan, Missouri. The pilot and five parachutists were killed, and two parachutists were seriously injured.

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C-182B Non-Fatal East Moriches, NY August 6, 2005

Posted by on Aug 6, 2005 in 2005, C-182, East Moriches, Mechanical Failure, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, NY | 0 comments

The airplane took off with its third lift of skydivers for the day. The engine began to run roughly at rotation, and due to the speed of the airplane, and the lack of remaining runway, the pilot elected to continue the takeoff. The pilot initially turned toward a public roadway for a forced landing, but the airplane continued to climb under partial power, so he maneuvered back to the airport for a downwind landing on the runway.

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Beech D18 Non-Fatal Tullahoma, TN September 6, 2004

Posted by on Sep 6, 2004 in 2004, Beech 18, Mechanical Failure, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Multi-Engine, TN, Tullahoma | 0 comments

During takeoff roll, the airplane’s right landing gear tire blew. The left wing raised up and the airplane drifted right. The pilot shut down the power. The pilot then stated that the right wheel caught the raised grass area on the edge of the runway. The airplane’s tail swung to the right and the right landing gear collapsed.

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Beech 65-A90 King Air Non-Fatal Fentress, TX October 17, 2003

Posted by on Oct 17, 2003 in 2003, Beech King Air 90, Fentress, Mechanical Failure, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Multi-Engine, TX | 0 comments

The airplane lost engine power during descent. The 1,127-hour pilot elected to perform emergency engine out procedures and prepared for an emergency landing. After impact, the pilot observed the right engine nacelle engulfed in flames, which then spread to the fuselage. Review of the engine logbook revealed the engine was being operated in excess of 1,000 hours of the manufacturer’s recommended time between overhauls of 3,600 hours.

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C-205 Fatal (4) Jeanette, PA June 15, 2003

Posted by on Jun 15, 2003 in 2003, 4, C-205, Fatal, Fatal Single-Engine, Jeanette, Mechanical Failure, PA | 0 comments

The 363-hour single-engine commercial rated pilot lost control of the airplane during a parachute activity flight. The airplane subsequently stalled and entered a spin to the left. A witness radioed the pilot and asked what was wrong, and the pilot replied that he was in a spin and didn’t know what to do.

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