2002

PA-32-300 Fatal (1) Steamboat Springs, CO December 29th, 2002

Posted by on Dec 29, 2002 in 1, 2002, CO, Fatal, Fatal Single-Engine, Ferry, PA-32-300, Steamboat Springs | 0 comments

The pilot departed with three passengers and three dogs, but only two seats. The airplane had been reconfigured (STC SA00352DE) for parachute jumping operations. The STC included the stipulation that the airplane could be used only for parachutist launching operations. Also, Title 14 CFR Part 91.107, (a)(3), states that each occupant of a civil aircraft must be provided with an approved seat [the fatally injured passenger was not] with seat belt, for movement on the surface, takeoff, and landing operations.

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C-182B Non-Fatal Hartwood, VA October 18, 2002

Posted by on Oct 18, 2002 in 2002, C-182, Fuel Exhaustion, Hartwood, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, VA | 0 comments

Approximately 1 hour into flight, the engine lost all power, and the pilot attempted a forced landing to a field. During the landing, the airplane struck a tree located at the approach end of the field. The pilot initially reported that he departed with 2 inches of fuel in each tank, with the intention of flying 1 hour.

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C-208 Caravan Non-Fatal Pawtucket, RI September 29, 2002

Posted by on Sep 29, 2002 in 2002, C-208 Caravan, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, Pawtucket, Prop Strike, RI | 0 comments

After a parachute drop flight, the airplane taxied back to the ramp area. The airplane was parked on the ramp, with the engine running, while the next group of parachutists were boarding the airplane. During that time, a parachutist who had just landed, contacted the propeller and sustained a serious injury.

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C-182 Non-Fatal Estacada, OR September 28, 2002

Posted by on Sep 28, 2002 in 2002, C-182, Estacada, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, OR, Tail Strike | 0 comments

While the aircraft was level at 10,500 feet above sea level (MSL), four skydivers took their positions on the right exterior jump-step of the aircraft. Just after the last jumper was on the step, the parachute of one of the jumpers inadvertently deployed and streamed back into the aircraft’s tail surfaces.

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C-182G Non-Fatal Paradise, CA September 28, 2002

Posted by on Sep 28, 2002 in 2002, C-182, CA, Loss of Aircraft Control, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, Paradise | 0 comments

The pilot made a hard landing collapsing the nose gear and damaging the firewall. The pilot took off and turned to downwind for landing. He reported that he flew an uneventful and normal approach. He said that he touched down on the main landing gear, but the nose gear folded under the airplane as it touched down.

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Bell 412 Fatal (1) Rantoul, IL August 2, 2002

Posted by on Aug 2, 2002 in 1, 2002, Bell 412, Fatal, IL, Prop Strike, Rantoul | 0 comments

The helicopter’s main rotor blade contacted a photographer fatally injuring him. Before lift off, ground crew informed the pilot that there were four canopies in the vicinity of the takeoff area. The pilot immediately took off and began following a mowed grass area adjacent to an area of corn in which the photographer was standing in and unseen by the pilot.

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C-182A Non-Fatal Siler City, NC July 02, 2002

Posted by on Jul 2, 2002 in 2002, C-182, Ferry, NC, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, Siler City | 0 comments

The pilot stated that he had recently purchased the airplane in Deland, Florida, and was ferrying it to Southeast Greensboro Airport, Greensboro, North Carolina. He said that he was enroute to the Siler City Municipal Airport, Siler City, North Carolina, for a scheduled fuel stop, and was approaching the airport at an altitude of about 5,500 feet, when the engine ceased operating.

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C-182B Non-Fatal Ellington, CT June 24, 2002

Posted by on Jun 24, 2002 in 2002, C-182, CA, Ellington, Fuel Exhaustion, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine | 0 comments

After the parachutists jumped, the airplane was descending through 9,000 feet msl, and the engine lost partial power. The pilot verified that carburetor heat was on, the cowl flaps were closed, the fuel selector was positioned to “Both,” and the mixture was rich. She continued descending and entered a left traffic pattern for the runway. The pilot initially judged her pattern distance based on the available engine power.

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C-182B Non-Fatal Littlestown, PA June 2, 2002

Posted by on Jun 2, 2002 in 2002, C-182, Littlestown, Loss of Aircraft Control, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, PA | 0 comments

While landing on runway 3, the airplane’s right wing contacted the runway and the airplane landed hard. A weather observation reported at an airport about 18 miles northeast of the accident site, included winds from 320 degrees at 13 knots. The pilot further reported that he conducted an uneventful flight an hour prior to the accident, with the same wind conditions.

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C-182P Non-Fatal Boulder City, NV May 7, 2002

Posted by on May 7, 2002 in 2002, Boulder City, C-182, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, NV, Preflight | 0 comments

The airplane initiated a forced landing after a partial loss of engine power during the takeoff initial climb. During the initial run-up the magneto check was not within acceptable limits; however, approximately 15 minutes later the pilot rechecked the magnetos and they were within acceptable limits. The pilot said he configured and checked the airplane prior to takeoff with 10 degrees of flaps and all gages “in the green.”

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C-182C Non-Fatal Moneta, VA March 24, 2002

Posted by on Mar 24, 2002 in 2002, C-182, Fuel Exhaustion, Moneta, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, VA | 0 comments

After releasing parachutists, the pilot planned to return to the airport. During the descent, about 2,500 feet msl, the engine began to lose power. The pilot thought that carburetor ice caused the power loss, and performed emergency procedures, which included the application of carburetor heat. The engine did not regain power, and the pilot planned an emergency landing to a field.

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C-182F Non-Fatal Pell City, AL March 23, 2002

Posted by on Mar 23, 2002 in 2002, AL, C-182, Loss of Aircraft Control, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, Pell City | 0 comments

On the fourth parachute drop flight of the day for the pilot and aircraft, the pilot detected a reduction in elevator control authority on takeoff. He elected to continue the takeoff and climbed to 3,500 feet agl, where he released the two parachutists. On return to the airport, he used power to control his flare, but landed hard and began a porpoise maneuver.

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C-182C Fatal Mid-Air Marana, AZ March 15, 2002

Posted by on Mar 15, 2002 in 2002, AZ, C-182, Collisions Other, Fatal, Fatal Single-Engine, Marana | 0 comments

A US Army Pilatus UV-20A collided in midair with a Cessna 182C during parachute jumping operations. The collision occurred about 4,800 feet msl (2,800 feet agl) on the northeast side of runway 12 abeam the approach end. Both aircraft had made multiple flights taking jumpers aloft prior to the accident. The Pilatus departed runway 12 about 5 minutes prior to the Cessna’s departure on the same runway.

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PC-6 Fatal (1) Porter Mid-Air Marana, AZ March 15, 2002

Posted by on Mar 15, 2002 in 1, 2002, AZ, Collisions Other, Fatal, Fatal Single-Engine, Marana, PC-6 Pilatus Porter | 0 comments

A US Army Pilatus UV-20A collided in midair with a Cessna 182C during parachute jumping operations. The collision occurred about 4,800 feet mean sea level (msl) (2,800 feet above ground level (agl)) on the northeast side of runway 12 abeam the approach end. Both aircraft had made multiple flights taking jumpers aloft prior to the accident. The Pilatus departed runway 12 about 5 minutes prior to the Cessna’s departure on the same runway.

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