PC-6 Pilatus Porter

PC-6 Non-Fatal DeLand, FL October 3, 2005

Posted by on Oct 3, 2005 in 2005, Deland, FL, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, PC-6 Pilatus Porter, Preflight | 0 comments

The airline transport certificated pilot with 10 skydiving passengers began a takeoff in a tailwheel-equipped and turboprop powered airplane on a CFR Part 91 skydiving flight. As the airplane started its climb, the pitch angle of the nose of the airplane increased until the airplane appeared to stall about 50 to 100 feet agl. It descended and impacted the runway in a left wing, nose low attitude.

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PC-6 Non-Fatal Sturtevant, WI May 26, 2005

Posted by on May 26, 2005 in 2005, Collisions Other, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, PC-6 Pilatus Porter, Sturtevant, WI | 0 comments

The parachute jump plane was substantially damaged when it collided with a parachutist on final approach for landing. The pilot was not able to maintain directional control and the airplane impacted trees and terrain near the airport. The pilot stated that he was on final approach for landing, when a parachutist “made a rapid descent and accelerated from behind [his] right wing.”

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PC-6 Porter Non-Fatal Vigo Park, TX August 28,2003

Posted by on Aug 28, 2003 in 2003, Loss of Aircraft Control, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, PC-6 Pilatus Porter, TX, Vigo Park | 0 comments

During cruise flight, the 33,000-hour pilot stated that the airplane encountered “extreme clear air turbulence followed by three jolts in rapid succession.” He “heard a loud pop as he jerked the throttle to the flight idle position.” As the airspeed was slowing, the pilot attempted to add power. The “throttle would not move from the flight idle position and the propeller went into BETA.”

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PC-6 Fatal (1) Porter Mid-Air Marana, AZ March 15, 2002

Posted by on Mar 15, 2002 in 1, 2002, AZ, Collisions Other, Fatal, Fatal Single-Engine, Marana, PC-6 Pilatus Porter | 0 comments

A US Army Pilatus UV-20A collided in midair with a Cessna 182C during parachute jumping operations. The collision occurred about 4,800 feet mean sea level (msl) (2,800 feet above ground level (agl)) on the northeast side of runway 12 abeam the approach end. Both aircraft had made multiple flights taking jumpers aloft prior to the accident. The Pilatus departed runway 12 about 5 minutes prior to the Cessna’s departure on the same runway.

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PC-6 Porter Non-Fatal Lexington, TX Oct. 28, 1997

Posted by on Oct 28, 1997 in 1997, Loss of Aircraft Control, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, PC-6 Pilatus Porter | 0 comments

The pilot was delivering an airplane to a new airstrip. He had been driven to the airstrip to inspect it before the first landing. While landing to the south during the airstrip’s inaugural landing, the pilot lined up to land on the east side of the new runway, and the airplane touched down on an unimproved portion of the airstrip.

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PC-6 Porter Non-Fatal Gillette, WY August 26, 1997

Posted by on Aug 26, 1997 in 1997, Loss of Aircraft Control, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, PC-6 Pilatus Porter | 0 comments

On returning to land, following dropping a load of skydivers, the pilot failed to reset the stabilizer trim and ran out of elevator during the flare for landing. A hard landing occurred and the left main landing gear collapsed causing substantial damage to the underside of the fuselage.

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PC-6 Porter Non-Fatal Raeford, NC July 9, 1994

Posted by on Jul 9, 1994 in 1994, Improper/Poor Maintenance, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, PC-6 Pilatus Porter | 0 comments

The pilot was performing the initial takeoff, when he observed a loss of power, associated with a torque indication of zero. He force landed the aircraft in a wooded area when he could not make an open field. A post accident inspection of the engine revealed that the fuel control unit arm was loose, and the lock wire was not in place.

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