Non-Fatal Multi-Engine

Beech 65-A90 King Air Non-Fatal Fentress, TX October 17, 2003

Posted by on Oct 17, 2003 in 2003, Beech King Air 90, Fentress, Mechanical Failure, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Multi-Engine, TX | 0 comments

The airplane lost engine power during descent. The 1,127-hour pilot elected to perform emergency engine out procedures and prepared for an emergency landing. After impact, the pilot observed the right engine nacelle engulfed in flames, which then spread to the fuselage. Review of the engine logbook revealed the engine was being operated in excess of 1,000 hours of the manufacturer’s recommended time between overhauls of 3,600 hours.

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Beech 65-A90 Non-Fatal Lake Wales, FL July 2, 2000

Posted by on Jul 2, 2000 in 2000, Beech King Air 90, Collisions Other, FL, Lake Wales, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Multi-Engine | 0 comments

After takeoff the pilot raised the landing gear and then had to take evasive action to the right to avoid a flock of birds. As he performed the evasive maneuver, he raised the flaps. The aircraft was slow, and he kept the nose down to build up speed for the climb. Just as he was to commence the climb, he caught a glimpse of a wire ahead. He pulled up rapidly, but contacted the wire with the right wing.

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B-90 King Air Non-Fatal St. George, SC Nov. 27, 1999

Posted by on Nov 27, 1999 in 1999, Beech King Air 90, Fuel Exhaustion, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Multi-Engine | 0 comments

The pilot stated that he was at 12,500 feet, preparing for a four-mile parachute jump run, when he had initial indications of a power/fuel problem. He said he told the skydivers to exit, then initiated a descending spiral to land, during which time the fuel flow became erratic. He said both engines ceased operating at 3,000 feet, and he did not account for the northwest wind, and crashed short of the runway.

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DHC-6 Non-Fatal Sussex, NJ July 23, 1997

Posted by on Jul 23, 1997 in 1997, DHC-6 Twin Otter, Fuel Exhaustion, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Multi-Engine | 0 comments

The pilot departed on a 15-minute positioning flight. About 4 miles from the destination, both engines lost power, and the pilot landed in an open field, where the airplane struck trees. The pilot reported he departed with about 800 pounds of fuel on board, and thought the gauges indicated about 300 pounds remaining when the power loss occurred.

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Beech 50 Non-Fatal Tullahoma, TN June 28, 1997

Posted by on Jun 28, 1997 in 1997, Beech H50 Twin Bonanza, Improper/Poor Maintenance, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Multi-Engine | 0 comments

The airplane was being used for sport parachute operations. During the initial climb after takeoff the right engine failed followed by the airplane’s slow descending right turn into wooded terrain. The airplane crashed through trees and caught on fire. The fire was extinguished prior to the destruction of the airplane.

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Beech 65 Non-Fatal West Jordan, UT April 19, 1997

Posted by on Apr 19, 1997 in 1997, Beech 65 Queen Air, Mechanical Failure, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Multi-Engine | 0 comments

The pilot stated that after parachutists egressed from the airplane, he returned to the airport and found that he did not have a green down-and-locked indication for the left main landing gear. He stated that he executed emergency procedures and did two fly-bys over the runway. Ground personnel stated that the landing gear appeared to be down-and-locked.

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B-90 King Air Non-Fatal Longmont, CO Jan. 23, 1997

Posted by on Jan 23, 1997 in 1997, Beech King Air 90, Ferry, Fuel Exhaustion, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Multi-Engine | 0 comments

The pilot had made a refueling stop at Vandalia, Illinois. She did not observe the refueling process, but the FBO also operated a King Air and she felt he knew the proper procedure to follow. The airplane was reportedly serviced with 235 gallons of Jet-A fuel (total capacity is 384 gallons). The pilot flew between 7,500 and 10,500 feet.

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B-90 King Air Non-Fatal Orange, VA Nov. 16, 1996

Posted by on Nov 16, 1996 in 1996, Beech King Air 90, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Multi-Engine, Preflight | 0 comments

The pilot was taking off with 10 jumpers onboard. At the rotation speed of 100 knots, he used elevator trim to rotate the airplane, but it did not lift off the runway. He continued moving the trim wheel violently to pitch the nose up, and attempted to pull back on the yoke, but the airplane collided with rising terrain off the end of the runway.

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Beech 45 Non-Fatal Marshall, MI July 14, 1996

Posted by on Jul 14, 1996 in 1996, Beech 45 (Beech 18 military), Loss of Aircraft Control, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Multi-Engine | 0 comments

The pilot reported that the winds were from 260 degrees at 10 knots. During the takeoff roll on runway 28, at about 60 miles per hour, he ‘began to bring the tail up for a wheel takeoff…. The airplane began to veer to the left.’ He ‘attempted to get the airplane straight with right rudder and right brake. The airplane ran off of the runway and ground looped on top of a hill.’

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Cessna 411 Non-Fatal Rome, GA June 15, 1996

Posted by on Jun 15, 1996 in 1996, C-411, Fuel Exhaustion, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Multi-Engine | 0 comments

After a normal parachute drop at 13,000 feet, the pilot initiated a descent. As the airplane descended to 2300 feet, both engines lost power. Unable to restart either engine, the pilot initiated an emergency landing to runway 9 at the departure airport. However, before reaching the runway, the airplane collided with vegetation and the airport perimeter fence. An examination of the airplane failed to disclose a mechanical problem. No usable fuel was found in the fuel system during the postaccident examination.

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Beech 65-90 Non-Fatal San Diego, CA November 6, 1994

Posted by on Nov 6, 1994 in 1994, Beech King Air 90, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Multi-Engine, Tail Strike | 0 comments

The aircraft was damaged when a sport parachutist collided with the horizontal stabilizer while exiting the aircraft at 13,000 feet msl. According to statements from the pilots and other jumpers on board the aircraft, the injured jumper’s reserve parachute deployed as he exited the door. The parachute momentarily draped over the left leading edge of the horizontal stabilizer,

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Beech 45 Non-Fatal Acampo, CA April 24, 1994

Posted by on Apr 24, 1994 in 1994, Beech 45 (Beech 18 military), Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Multi-Engine, Preflight | 0 comments

The pilot was conducting a local skydiving flight. During the climb, both engines began to operate intermittently. The pilot instructed the parachutists to bail out at 9,000 feet msl and returned to the airport. The pilot failed to use carburetor heat during the descent. The pilot applied power to both engines while on final approach, but got no response.

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Beech 18 Non-Fatal Xenia, OH May 1, 1993

Posted by on May 1, 1993 in 1993, Beech 18, Fuel Exhaustion, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Multi-Engine | 0 comments

Shortly after takeoff, both engines lost power. The pilot said he selected different fuel tanks, but could not restart the engines. He subsequently made a wheels-up forced landing in a field below his flight path. The pilot stated that he had performed a preflight inspection and that there was 4.1 gals in both the front left and right main fuel tanks. Examination of the airplane after the accident revealed a combined total of about 5 gals in the forward left and right tanks.

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DC-3 Non-Fatal Zephyrhills, FL April 20, 1993

Posted by on Apr 20, 1993 in 1993, DC-3, Improper/Poor Maintenance, Mechanical Failure, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Multi-Engine | 0 comments

The pilot stated that on initial climb, at about 400 ft agl, the crew smelled something burning, followed by light smoke in the cabin. Both engines appeared normal visually. The odor and smoke increased, and the left fire warning light illuminated. The left engine was shut down & the prop feathered. The pilot increased power on the right engine; however, the airplane would not climb or maintain airspeed.

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Beech 90 Non-Fatal Waynesville, OH July 20, 1991

Posted by on Jul 20, 1991 in 1991, Beech King Air 90, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Multi-Engine, Tail Strike | 0 comments

As the jumpmaster and student jumper backed into the door of the airplane in preparation for a tandem jump, he had a uncommanded deployment of his reserve parachute, that dragged them out the door. The jumpers went under the left horizontal stabilizer while the canopy went over the top. After a few seconds, the parachute shroud lines cut through the horizontal stabilizer and deformed the left elevator Read the NTSB...

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Beech 65 Non-Fatal California, MD June 2, 1991

Posted by on Jun 2, 1991 in 1991, Beech 65 Queen Air, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Multi-Engine, Undetermined | 0 comments

The pilot reported that shortly after takeoff on a parachute jumping flt the left engine lost power, but a second later power was restored. Soon afterwards a total power loss occurred. According to the pilot, the propeller stopped rotating and did not windmill. He did not feather the left propeller. He made a shallow left turn toward an open field, while trying to return to the airport. He was unable to maintain adequate airspeed or altitude, and in order to maintain aircraft control, he reduced power on the right enggine. He made a forced landing in a wheat field. The airplane came to a stop and all occupants escaped the airplane before it caught fire. The examination of the airplane did not disclose evidence of mechanical malfunction. Read the NTSB...

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DHC-6 Non-Fatal Perris Valley, CA December 9, 1990

Posted by on Dec 9, 1990 in 1990, DHC-6 Twin Otter, Improper/Poor Maintenance, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Multi-Engine | 0 comments

After lift-off, at about 100 ft agl and 85 kts, the left eng decelerated and the airplane began to yaw and roll left. The pic aborted the takeoff, turned left and landed on a flat level field. The airplane struck a fence, then trees. Examination of the left eng revealed the loss of power was attributed to a fatigue fracture of a compressor turbine blade, which led to subsequent blade fractures. The right eng was examined and found to have advance wear on the throttle cam assembly of the power turbine governor. In a test cell, only aprx 28% of takeoff power could be achieved. The cam lobe wear had progressed over an extended period of time. The right engine prop governor was replaced 11/18/90, followed by a test run. Read the NTSB...

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