2001

C-182 Non-Fatal Chickasha, OK Oct. 6, 2001

Posted by on Oct 6, 2001 in 2001, C-182, Chickasha, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, OK, Undetermined | 0 comments

After the pilot dispatched two parachutists, the pilot commenced his descent to return to the airport. While on final approach, approximately 200 feet AGL, the engine lost power. The pilot attempted to land in a nearby open field rather than to attempt maneuvering around high power lines near the airport.

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C-182 Non-Fatal North Pole, AK Sept. 23, 2001

Posted by on Sep 23, 2001 in 2001, AK, C-182, Fuel Contamination, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, North Pole | 0 comments

The certificated commercial pilot was conducting skydiving operations in the vicinity of the accident airport. After the airplane climbed to about 11,500 feet msl, all three of the skydivers aboard exited the airplane, and the pilot began a descent to return to the departure airport. The pilot said that while on approach, all engine power was lost, and emergency engine procedures did not restore engine power.

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C-182 Non-Fatal Salado, TX Aug. 18, 2001

Posted by on Aug 18, 2001 in 2001, C-182, Fuel Exhaustion, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, Salado, TX | 0 comments

After the sky divers exited the airplane at 12,000 feet, the engine lost power while the airplane was descending through 10,000 feet. The pilot switched fuel tanks and engine power was reestablished. The engine again lost power at 4,000 feet and the pilot attempted a forced landing at his home base airport.

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C-182 Non-Fatal Headland, AL July 28, 2001

Posted by on Jul 28, 2001 in 2001, AL, C-182, Headland, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, Undetermined | 0 comments

The pilot stated that as the aircraft descended, the engine was operating at 2000 rpm, and the selected manifold pressure was 15 in Hg, and at 8,000 feet he noticed that the engine had ceased operating. Prior to noticing that the engine had ceased operating he said everything had been normal, but as he maneuvered to land he felt he was too far down the runway to land safely, so he elected to perform a go-around.

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C-182 Non-Fatal Taylorville, IL July 4, 2001

Posted by on Jul 4, 2001 in 2001, C-182, Carburetor Icing, IL, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, Taylorville | 0 comments

The airplane nosed over in a cornfield during a forced landing after a total loss of engine power. The pilot reported he released the parachutists at 10,100 feet msl over the drop zone and started the descent to the south due to better cloud clearances and to keep clear of company traffic. He reported that he applied carburetor heat before descending.

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DHC-6 Fatal (1) Fentress, TX May 27, 2001

Posted by on May 27, 2001 in 1, 2001, DHC-6 Twin Otter, Fatal, Fatal Multi-Engine, Fentress, Formation Flying, Mid Air, Prop Strike, TX | 0 comments

A de Havilland DHC-6 and a Beech King Air 90 were to make a formation air drop of skydivers from 14,000 feet msl. The de Havilland was to be the lead aircraft with the King Air in trail. As the skydivers prepared to exit, the King Air was traveling faster than the de Havilland, and the pilot of the King Air had to pitch up and bank right to avoid the de Havilland.

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DHC-3 Non-Fatal Decatur, TX March 31, 2001

Posted by on Mar 31, 2001 in 2001, Decatur, DHC-3 Single Otter, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, Preflight, TX | 0 comments

The pilot and 21 jumpers were aboard the airplane for the local skydiving flight. The airplane took off to the north on the wet grass runway. Jumpers reported that during the initial takeoff climb, the aircraft assumed a “very steep angle of attack,” and described the pilot “winding the wheel on the lower right side of the chair clockwise, frantically,” and “busy with a wheel between the seats.”

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C-182 Non-Fatal Boulder City, NV March 16, 2001

Posted by on Mar 16, 2001 in 2001, Boulder City, C-182, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, NV, Undetermined | 0 comments

The pilot of the skydiver dropping aircraft reported that the engine lost power at the end of his descent from the 12,000-foot drop altitude as the airplane approached a landing 3-mile base leg. When the engine lost power, he checked that the fuel selector was in the “both” tanks position, the mixture was in the “rich” position, and checked individual magnetos; all with no effect.

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C-P206 Non-Fatal Derby, KS March 9, 2001

Posted by on Mar 9, 2001 in 2001, C-P206, Derby, Engine Failure, KS, Mechanical Failure, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine | 0 comments

The airplane sustained substantial damage on impact with trees and terrain during a forced landing to a field following an in-flight loss of engine power. Skydivers had been dropped prior to the loss of engine power and the pilot reported no injuries. The pilot stated, “I climbed to 11000 [feet.] Was not getting usual climb rate. Before decent found I could not close cowl flaps. Decended to 6000 feet. Noticed eratic raise on manifold gage.

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B-90 King Air Fatal (9) Lake Point, UT January 14, 2001

Posted by on Jan 14, 2001 in 2001, 9, Beech King Air 90, Fatal, Fatal Multi-Engine, Ferry, UT | 0 comments

The pilot and eight parachutists were returning from a skydive meet. The pilot had obtained a weather briefing, which advised of instrument meteorological conditions at the destination, and filed a VFR flight plan, but it was never activated. Witnesses heard, but could not see, a twin engine turboprop pass over the airport, heading north out over the Great Salt Lake. They described the weather conditions as being a low ceiling with 1/4-mile visibility,

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C-182 Non-Fatal Parkton, NC January 7, 2001

Posted by on Jan 7, 2001 in 2001, C-182, Fuel Starvation, NC, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, Parkton | 0 comments

The flight departed with approximately 20 gallons of fuel in each fuel tank and offloaded skydivers at 10,500 feet, then descended to return with the throttle at idle, the fuel/air ratio leaned; and carburetor heat applied. At 2,000 feet, the pilot began to level off and, “realized I was having engine trouble and began my emergency procedures for an engine failure at altitude….”

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