PA

C-180 Fatal (1) Freedom, PA October 27, 2004

Posted by on Oct 27, 2004 in 1, 2004, C-180, Fatal, Fatal Single-Engine, Freedom, Loss of Aircraft Control, PA | 0 comments

The pilot did not perform weight and balance calculations for the accident flight; though, postaccident calculations indicated that the airplane was under gross weight and the center of gravity was within limits. The pilot reported that he did not have any memory of the accident flight. The accident flight was the second flight of the day for the pilot and began immediately after landing from the previous skydive drop flight.

Read the NTSB report…

Read More

C-205 Fatal (4) Jeanette, PA June 15, 2003

Posted by on Jun 15, 2003 in 2003, 4, C-205, Fatal, Fatal Single-Engine, Jeanette, Mechanical Failure, PA | 0 comments

The 363-hour single-engine commercial rated pilot lost control of the airplane during a parachute activity flight. The airplane subsequently stalled and entered a spin to the left. A witness radioed the pilot and asked what was wrong, and the pilot replied that he was in a spin and didn’t know what to do.

Read the NTSB report…

Read More

C-182B Non-Fatal Littlestown, PA June 2, 2002

Posted by on Jun 2, 2002 in 2002, C-182, Littlestown, Loss of Aircraft Control, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, PA | 0 comments

While landing on runway 3, the airplane’s right wing contacted the runway and the airplane landed hard. A weather observation reported at an airport about 18 miles northeast of the accident site, included winds from 320 degrees at 13 knots. The pilot further reported that he conducted an uneventful flight an hour prior to the accident, with the same wind conditions.

Read the NTSB report…

Read More

C-182 Non-Fatal Freedom, PA June 17, 2000

Posted by on Jun 17, 2000 in 2000, C-182, Freedom, Loss of Aircraft Control, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, PA | 0 comments

Prior to the day of the accident, the pilot had not flown out of the airstrip. During takeoff, the airplane traveled over a ‘soft spot’, and began to veer to the left. The pilot was unable to correct the turn, the airplane went off the left side of the runway and struck a tree. The runway was 1,515 feet long, 110 feet wide, and consisted of soft turf. Review of the pilot’s weight and balance calculations revealed that the airplane was approximately 300 pounds over the maximum gross takeoff weight.

Read the NTSB report…

Read More