Undetermined

C-182A Non-Fatal Russelville, KY April 21, 2007

Posted by on Apr 21, 2007 in 2007, C-182, KY, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, Russelville, Undetermined | 0 comments

After releasing skydivers, the pilot was descending the airplane from 11,000 feet and returning to his home airport. He utilized carburetor heat while descending to 3,000 feet, and everything seemed normal during the approach to the 3,999-foot-long asphalt runway. The bounced upon landing and the pilot initiated a go-around; however, the airplane experienced a loss of engine power during the initial climb, about 50 to 75 feet above ground level (agl).

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C-182A Non-Fatal Kapowsin, WA November 8, 2003

Posted by on Nov 8, 2003 in 2003, C-182, Kapowsin, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, Undetermined, WA | 0 comments

After completing a flight with a load of skydivers, the pilot “dipped” the left tank and it indicated 15 gallons of fuel. He then flew another flight to 3,500 feet MSL and started his descent. The pilot reduced power to 1,600 rpm and 16 inches of manifold pressure, and applied full carburetor heat. As the aircraft was approaching pattern altitude, approximately 1,000 AGL, the engine quit without warning.

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C-182A Non-Fatal Pine Haven, WY September 7, 2003

Posted by on Sep 7, 2003 in 2003, C-182, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, Pine Haven, Undetermined, WY | 0 comments

According to the pilot, he completed an air drop of skydivers and was returning to land. During the final approach, he added power to maintain altitude and obstacle clearance, and the engine “quit without sputter[ing].” He made a forced landing in a sagebrush covered field. The airplane struck the ground, slid down a gully, and struck a tree.

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C-182 Non-Fatal Chickasha, OK Oct. 6, 2001

Posted by on Oct 6, 2001 in 2001, C-182, Chickasha, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, OK, Undetermined | 0 comments

After the pilot dispatched two parachutists, the pilot commenced his descent to return to the airport. While on final approach, approximately 200 feet AGL, the engine lost power. The pilot attempted to land in a nearby open field rather than to attempt maneuvering around high power lines near the airport.

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C-182 Non-Fatal Headland, AL July 28, 2001

Posted by on Jul 28, 2001 in 2001, AL, C-182, Headland, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, Undetermined | 0 comments

The pilot stated that as the aircraft descended, the engine was operating at 2000 rpm, and the selected manifold pressure was 15 in Hg, and at 8,000 feet he noticed that the engine had ceased operating. Prior to noticing that the engine had ceased operating he said everything had been normal, but as he maneuvered to land he felt he was too far down the runway to land safely, so he elected to perform a go-around.

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C-182 Non-Fatal Boulder City, NV March 16, 2001

Posted by on Mar 16, 2001 in 2001, Boulder City, C-182, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, NV, Undetermined | 0 comments

The pilot of the skydiver dropping aircraft reported that the engine lost power at the end of his descent from the 12,000-foot drop altitude as the airplane approached a landing 3-mile base leg. When the engine lost power, he checked that the fuel selector was in the “both” tanks position, the mixture was in the “rich” position, and checked individual magnetos; all with no effect.

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C-TU206 Non-Fatal Jeanerette, LA Oct. 23, 1999

Posted by on Oct 23, 1999 in 1999, C-206 Turbo-Charged, C-U206, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, Undetermined | 0 comments

The pilot stated that while descending through 6,000 feet msl, the engine lost power. The pilot reported that when he enriched the mixture, the engine regained power. He stated that he left the mixture full rich; however, when the airplane was at 600 feet and turning to base, the engine lost power again.

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B-90 King Air Fatal (1) Hawaii May 22, 1999

Posted by on May 22, 1999 in 1, 1999, Beech King Air 90, Fatal, Fatal Multi-Engine, Undetermined | 0 comments

Following the 12th sport parachute jump of the day, which occurred after sunset, ground witnesses observed the airplane descend into the ocean in a left wing low, nose down attitude. They did not hear the engines sputtering or popping, or see the airplane make any erratic movements during its descent.

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C-182 Non-Fatal Waycross, GA Nov. 23, 1997

Posted by on Nov 23, 1997 in 1997, C-182, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, Undetermined | 0 comments

The pilot stated he was attempting to land after another airplane which had stopped on the runway. He transmitted three times in an attempt to get the other airplane to expedite off the runway. He then executed a go-around using full power and low pitch. According to the pilot, the engine accelerated briefly, then sputtered, and the propeller began windmilling.

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C-182 Non-Fatal Paris, TN September 7, 1997

Posted by on Sep 7, 1997 in 1997, C-182, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, Undetermined | 0 comments

After descending from 3,000 feet with engine power off and the carburetor heat on, the pilot entered the traffic pattern to land. While on downwind and base legs the pilot cleared the engine and it responded normally. While on final approach he increased the engine throttle and the engine did not respond.

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C-182 Fatal (5) Smithfield, RI Sept. 6, 1997

Posted by on Sep 6, 1997 in 1997, 5, C-182, Fatal, Fatal Single-Engine, Undetermined | 0 comments

The airplane flew eight times on the same day, prior to the accident flight, taking skydivers aloft and releasing them. According to the airplane’s log, the airplane was refueled 2 flights prior to the accident flight with 20 gallons of fuel. According to the owner, this was to keep the airplane within the center of gravity limits.

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C-182 Non-Fatal Skiatook, OK July 21, 1996

Posted by on Jul 21, 1996 in 1996, C-182, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, Undetermined | 0 comments

During the landing approach, the pilot realized the airplane was high and ‘started a go around, obtaining partial power.’ When he added additional power, the engine ‘stalled.’ A forced landing was made on the airport. The airplane crossed a taxiway and struck a stockpile of building material. Following the accident, the engine was started and ran ‘normally.’

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C-182 Non-Fatal Toledo, WA June 21, 1996

Posted by on Jun 21, 1996 in 1996, C-182, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, Undetermined | 0 comments

The pilot reported that after parachutists (skydivers) jumped from 13,000 feet, he returned to the airport. While on base leg for landing, two radio-controlled model airplanes were observed flying near the approach end of the runway. The model airplanes swung wide and blocked the first 2,000 feet of the approach end of the runway; thus, moving the available touchdown zone closer to the departure end of the runway.

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C-182 Non-Fatal Walworth, WI September 3, 1995

Posted by on Sep 3, 1995 in 1995, C-182, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, Undetermined | 0 comments

The pilot reported that climbing through 550 feet agl, the engine lost power. He lowered the nose of the airplane, established a glide, checked the engine controls and fuel selector, and pulled the carburetor heat control to no avail. At one point, ‘the engine started but would run at a fast idle, and for only a few seconds.’ he conducted a forced landing in a soybean field. Examination of the wreckage revealed no anomalies. During a test in a production test cell, the engine operated normally and produced maximum rated power.

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C-182 Non-Fatal Woodstock, CT June 13, 1993

Posted by on Jun 13, 1993 in 1993, C-182, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, Undetermined | 0 comments

The airplane was at 8000 feet, four parachutist had jumped, and the pilot then descended the airplane to the pattern altitude of 1,400 feet. During this descent, carburetor heat was not applied. The pilot then initiated the approach and landing to runway 19. During the approach the pilot applied carburetor heat twice for short periods of time. On final approach the pilot needed additional power to reach the runway.

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C-182 Non-Fatal Washington, OK March 26, 1993

Posted by on Mar 26, 1993 in 1993, C-182, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, Undetermined | 0 comments

The airplane was being used to haul skydivers. According to the pilot, after about the third or fourth flight, there was a partial loss of power, due to a fuel tank vent that had been blocked by a mud dauber nest. The pilot noted that when a fuel cap was removed, he heard a ‘hiss’ as differential air pressure was relieved. Maintenance was performed to clear the vent, then the pilot continued hauling skydivers.

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C-182 Non-Fatal Marion, IA October 3, 1992

Posted by on Oct 3, 1992 in 1992, C-182, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, Undetermined | 0 comments

The pilot stated after the third parachute jumper exited the aircraft, he ‘…Continued at reduced power and started to glide down…For landing. As i was starting a long final approach i saw that i would need power to maintain the glide slope. There was no response when i advanced the throttle.’ attempts to restart the engine were unsuccessful and the pilot made a forced landing.

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C-182 Non-Fatal Beeville, TX June 6, 1992

Posted by on Jun 6, 1992 in 1992, C-182, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, Undetermined | 0 comments

During a vfr final approach, following a parachute jumping flight, to a private airstrip the engine lost all power. The pilot made a forced landing into a field. The owner/operator reported that the flaps remained in the up position at the accident site and that the pilot had stated the flaps remained in the up position during the approach and landing. The manufacturers’ procedures list full flaps for a shortfield landing. During the flare/touchdown the nose gear collapsed and the airplane came to rest in an inverted position. The cause of the power loss was not determined.

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Beech 65 Non-Fatal California, MD June 2, 1991

Posted by on Jun 2, 1991 in 1991, Beech 65 Queen Air, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Multi-Engine, Undetermined | 0 comments

The pilot reported that shortly after takeoff on a parachute jumping flt the left engine lost power, but a second later power was restored. Soon afterwards a total power loss occurred. According to the pilot, the propeller stopped rotating and did not windmill. He did not feather the left propeller. He made a shallow left turn toward an open field, while trying to return to the airport. He was unable to maintain adequate airspeed or altitude, and in order to maintain aircraft control, he reduced power on the right enggine. He made a forced landing in a wheat field. The airplane came to a stop and all occupants escaped the airplane before it caught fire. The examination of the airplane did not disclose evidence of mechanical malfunction. Read the NTSB...

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