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2017 CA Collisions Other DHC-6 Twin Otter Loss of Aircraft Control Non-Fatal Multi-Engine Perris

DHC-6 Twin Otter Non-Fatal Perris, CA May 24, 2017

The pilot of the twin-engThe pilot of the twin-engine, turbine-powered airplane reported that, while providing flights for
skydivers throughout the day, he had a potential new hire pilot flying with him in the right seat. He
added that, on the eighth flight of the day, the new pilot was flying during the approach and
“approximately 200′ [ft.] south from the threshold of [runway] 15 at approximately 15 feet AGL [above
ground level] the bottom violently and unexpectedly dropped out. [He] believe[d] some kind of wind
shear caused the aircraft [to] slam onto [the] runway and bounce into the air at a 45 to 60-degree bank
angle to the right.” The prospective pilot then said, “you got it.” The pilot took control of the airplane
and initiated a go-around by increasing power, which aggravated the “off runway heading.” The right
wing contacted the ground, the airplane exited the runway to the right and impacted a fuel truck, and the
right wing separated from the airplane. The impact caused the pilot to unintentionally add max power,
and the airplane, with only the left engine functioning, ground looped to the right, coming to rest nose
down.

Read the NTSB report.ine, turbine powered airplane reported that while providing flights for skydivers throughout the day, he had a potential new hire pilot flying with him in the right seat. He added that on the eighth flight of the day, the new pilot was flying during the approach and “approximately 200′ [ft.] south from the threshold of [runway] 15 at approximately 15 feet AGL [above ground level] the bottom violently and unexpectedly dropped out.

Read the NTSB report.

The pilot of the twin-engine, turbine-powered airplane reported that, while providing flights for
skydivers throughout the day, he had a potential new hire pilot flying with him in the right seat. He
added that, on the eighth flight of the day, the new pilot was flying during the approach and
“approximately 200′ [ft.] south from the threshold of [runway] 15 at approximately 15 feet AGL [above
ground level] the bottom violently and unexpectedly dropped out. [He] believe[d] some kind of wind
shear caused the aircraft [to] slam onto [the] runway and bounce into the air at a 45 to 60-degree bank
angle to the right.” The prospective pilot then said, “you got it.” The pilot took control of the airplane
and initiated a go-around by increasing power, which aggravated the “off runway heading.” The right
wing contacted the ground, the airplane exited the runway to the right and impacted a fuel truck, and the
right wing separated from the airplane. The impact caused the pilot to unintentionally add max power,
and the airplane, with only the left engine functioning, ground looped to the right, coming to rest nose
down.

Read the NTSB report.

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