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2014 C-182 Lexington Non-Fatal Non-Fatal Single-Engine TX

C-182A Non-Fatal Lexington, TX February 9, 2014

The pilot reported that, during the descent, he applied carburetor heat but that he then removed
carburetor heat when leveling off. The pilot reduced the throttle to slow the airplane while on final
approach. When he advanced the throttle to maintain airspeed, the engine power did not increase; the
pilot was unable to restore full engine power. The engine subsequently lost all power when the pilot
applied carburetor heat. During the forced landing to a field, the nose landing gear and propeller
contacted a barbed wire fence, and the airplane then nosed down, impacted the ground, and nosed over.
A postaccident examination revealed no mechanical failures that would have resulted in the loss of
engine power. The atmospheric conditions at the time of the accident were conducive to the formation of
serious carburetor icing at glide power. It is likely that carburetor ice developed after the pilot reduced
the engine power/closed the throttle while in the traffic pattern without applying carburetor heat, which
resulted in a loss of engine power. The manufacturer’s before landing checklist states to apply carburetor
heat before closing the throttle.

Read the NTSB report

The pilot reported that, during the descent, he applied carburetor heat but that he then removed
carburetor heat when leveling off. The pilot reduced the throttle to slow the airplane while on final
approach. When he advanced the throttle to maintain airspeed, the engine power did not increase; the
pilot was unable to restore full engine power. The engine subsequently lost all power when the pilot
applied carburetor heat. During the forced landing to a field, the nose landing gear and propeller
contacted a barbed wire fence, and the airplane then nosed down, impacted the ground, and nosed over.
A postaccident examination revealed no mechanical failures that would have resulted in the loss of
engine power. The atmospheric conditions at the time of the accident were conducive to the formation of
serious carburetor icing at glide power. It is likely that carburetor ice developed after the pilot reduced
the engine power/closed the throttle while in the traffic pattern without applying carburetor heat, which
resulted in a loss of engine power. The manufacturer’s before landing checklist states to apply carburetor
heat before closing the throttle.

Read the NTSB report

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