Fuel Starvation

C-TP206 Non-Fatal Sturgeon Bay, WI June 1, 2013

Posted by on Jun 1, 2013 in 2013, C-206 Turbo-Charged, C-P206, Fuel Starvation, Mechanical Failure, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, Sturgeon Bay, WI | 0 comments

The airplane experienced a total loss of engine power during a skydiving flight. After the pilot switched the fuel tank selector from the left fuel tank to the right fuel tank position, the engine restarted. The pilot continued the flight. While returning to the departure airport and preparing for landing, the pilot switched the fuel tank selector back to the left fuel tank position because the fuel gauge indicated a greater fuel quantity.

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C-205 Non-Fatal Lake Wales, FL March 31, 2012

Posted by on Mar 31, 2012 in 2012, C-205, FL, Fuel Starvation, Lake Wales, Mechanical Failure, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine | 0 comments

The pilot said that he normally flew the airplane with the fuel selector positioned to the right main fuel tank during skydiving operations. However, on the day of the accident, maintenance was performed on the airplane, and three engine run-ups were performed using the left main fuel tank.

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C-402 Non-Fatal Caldwell, ID June 20, 2011

Posted by on Jun 20, 2011 in 2011, C-402, Caldwell, Fuel Starvation, ID, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Multi-Engine | 0 comments

The pilot of the skydiving airplane was performing the first takeoff of the day, and he had just raised the landing gear when the airplane experienced a complete loss of power in one of its two engines. There was still runway remaining, and the pilot made the decision to abort the takeoff.

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C-P206 Non-Fatal Lake Wales, FL December 29, 2005

Posted by on Dec 29, 2005 in 2005, C-P206, FL, Fuel Starvation, Lake Wales, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine | 0 comments

The pilot reported that shortly after reaching an altitude of 400 feet agl after takeoff, the engine quit suddenly. He immediately pumped the throttle two times, and turned on the auxiliary fuel pump, but this did not restore engine power. He made a hard forced landing in an industrial park near the airport.

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C-182A Non-Fatal Elberta, AL May 1, 2004

Posted by on May 1, 2004 in 2004, AL, C-182, Elberta, Fuel Starvation, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine | 0 comments

According to the pilot, after the four parachute jumpers exited the airplane, and as he maneuvered the airplane for a landing, the engine lost power. Initial efforts by the pilot to restore full power were unsuccessful, however as the pilot continued, the engine regained partial power. The pilot entered a straight approach for runway 18

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C-182 Non-Fatal Parkton, NC January 7, 2001

Posted by on Jan 7, 2001 in 2001, C-182, Fuel Starvation, NC, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, Parkton | 0 comments

The flight departed with approximately 20 gallons of fuel in each fuel tank and offloaded skydivers at 10,500 feet, then descended to return with the throttle at idle, the fuel/air ratio leaned; and carburetor heat applied. At 2,000 feet, the pilot began to level off and, “realized I was having engine trouble and began my emergency procedures for an engine failure at altitude….”

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C-182 Non-Fatal Smithville, TN August 3, 1996

Posted by on Aug 3, 1996 in 1996, C-182, Fuel Starvation, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine | 0 comments

During takeoff for the sport parachute operation, the engine sputtered and quit, and the pilot landed the airplane in a residential yard. Examination revealed that fuel flow through the fuel selector valve was restricted. The fuel selector was disassembled, and the O-rings for the left side were found swelled.

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C-182 Non-Fatal Pepperal, MA July 7, 1990

Posted by on Jul 7, 1990 in 1990, C-182, Fuel Starvation, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine | 0 comments

The wing flaps jammed in the mid range position. The parachutist on board exited the airplane and the pilot returned for a landing. He extended the traffic pattern and while on base leg, the engine lost power. He was unable to get the engine restarted and was beyond gliding distance to the airport. The pilot executed an off airport landing in a field, downwind. The faa reported the flaps were jammed due to a broken flap support on the inboard left flap track and the engine was test run satisfactory after the accident. Fuel was reported to be at the 1/4 level. The power loss was attributed to the fuel selector being improperly position. Read the NTSB...

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C-182 Non-Fatal Wamego, KS May 17, 1987

Posted by on May 17, 1987 in 1987, C-182, Fuel Starvation, Loss of Aircraft Control, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine | 0 comments

The pic had been airborne in the lcl area to let parachute jumpers jump fm his acft. To lose alt quickly the pic performed a prolonged slip. On the final app the eng quit and alt was insufficient to reach the rwy for lndg. The off arpt lndg was unsuccessful. The pic stated that the poss cause of the acc was improper fuel flow resulting fm the slip and the abbormal attitude associated with it. It was also imcumbant upon the pic for a safe lndg to have selected the proper fuel posn by referring to the owner’s manual. The owner’s manual cautions abt proper fuel selector positioning. Fuel selector on ‘both’ is required for all but straight and level flt. The fuel selector was found posnd to ‘off’ during insp of the acft and 10 gal of fuel was found in the rt tank. No fuel was found in the left tank. Read the NTSB...

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PA-32 Non-Fatal Ogden, UT August 4, 1984

Posted by on Aug 4, 1984 in 1984, Fuel Starvation, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, PA-32-300 | 0 comments

After discharging sky divers, plt was concentrating on max rate of descent, eng pwr at idle, when fuel tank in use ran day. Pwr loss not noted until throttle applied for level off. Switch to usable fuel tank and restart attempt initiated with insufficient remaining altitude for successful result. Forced landing executed on freeway off ramp. Read the NTSB...

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