1995

Beech 65 Fatal (12) West Point, VA Sept. 10, 1995

Posted by on Sep 10, 1995 in 12, 1995, Beech 65 Queen Air, Fatal, Fatal Multi-Engine, Preflight | 0 comments

The airplane was loaded with 10 sport parachutists and one pilot. Later, investigators calculated that the maximum gross weight was exceeded by 149.6 pounds, and the center of gravity was 2.87 inches aft of the aft limit. The cabin door had been removed for parachuting operations; however, an altered Flight Manual Supplement had been used as authority for the door removal.

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C-182 Non-Fatal Walworth, WI September 3, 1995

Posted by on Sep 3, 1995 in 1995, C-182, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, Undetermined | 0 comments

The pilot reported that climbing through 550 feet agl, the engine lost power. He lowered the nose of the airplane, established a glide, checked the engine controls and fuel selector, and pulled the carburetor heat control to no avail. At one point, ‘the engine started but would run at a fast idle, and for only a few seconds.’ he conducted a forced landing in a soybean field. Examination of the wreckage revealed no anomalies. During a test in a production test cell, the engine operated normally and produced maximum rated power.

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C-182 Non-Fatal Derby, KS July 15, 1995

Posted by on Jul 15, 1995 in 1995, C-182, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, Preflight | 0 comments

The pilot reported that after the airplane reached an altitude of 10,500 feet msl, the skydivers exited the airplane. The pilot stated that he then began a wings-level, high-rate descent to stay clear of the drop zone. The mixture was at full rich and the carburetor heat was applied as he maintained 150 to 160 knots indicated airspeed.

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C-182 Non-Fatal Bowling Green, MO March 11, 1995

Posted by on Mar 11, 1995 in 1995, C-182, Fuel Exhaustion, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine | 0 comments

The airplane was descending for a landing when the engine suffered a total loss of power. The pilot stated that he had no memory of the accident. Although personnel who moved the airplane claimed that 15 or 16 gallons of fuel were removed from the accident airplane at the accident scene, only about six gallons could be located.

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