I wanted to create some sort of resource for new and old jump pilots to use for gathering information about flying skydivers. Whether you have 250 hours and wet ink on your commercial license or you have 10,000 hours and an ATP, I hope that you will find something useful on this site. Things I want to put on this website are SPECIFICS about  flying different types of aircraft in jump operations, an example syllabus for training, and a detailed list of jump plane accidents broken down by year, type aircraft and causes. This site should always be a work in progress. I hope that with time more pilots and jumpers will participate in growing this site.

Regulations don’t change often; however, the interpretation of regulations seems to evolve over the years. Hopefully we will be able to  provide timely information on any changes to part 61, 91, and 105 FAA regs involving skydiving operations.

Different types of aircraft are used across this nation and around the world  for the sole purpose of getting skydivers to altitude. The most common aircraft is the Cessna 182. Unfortunately, it is also the most common aircraft involved in accidents because of its widespread use. One section will describe  the most common practices and procedures for flying the 182. Another will describe some accidents. We all learn from our mistakes,  but learning from someone else’s mistakes or incidents beats the heck out of learning those lessons the hard way. I will also include other incidents and accidents on other types of aircraft as information becomes available and is verified. Accidents and incidents are no fun to talk about. Not learning from the mistakes of others means that we may be doomed to repeat them. Don’t let this happen to you.

Spotting with GPS becomes more and more popular  every year. But some pilots still don’t use its full potential. Here you will find tips on how to use GPS for spotting.

This site, as I said, will always be a work in progress. Enjoy. And feel free to comment.

Chris Schindler (contact)
D-19012
246-way Lead Pilot
300-way Left Wing Pilot
14,000+ total time
3,000+ flying skydivers
870+ jumps