Beech 65 Queen Air

Beech 65 Non-Fatal West Jordan, UT April 19, 1997

Posted by on Apr 19, 1997 in 1997, Beech 65 Queen Air, Mechanical Failure, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Multi-Engine | 0 comments

The pilot stated that after parachutists egressed from the airplane, he returned to the airport and found that he did not have a green down-and-locked indication for the left main landing gear. He stated that he executed emergency procedures and did two fly-bys over the runway. Ground personnel stated that the landing gear appeared to be down-and-locked.

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Beech 65 Fatal (12) West Point, VA Sept. 10, 1995

Posted by on Sep 10, 1995 in 12, 1995, Beech 65 Queen Air, Fatal, Fatal Multi-Engine, Preflight | 0 comments

The airplane was loaded with 10 sport parachutists and one pilot. Later, investigators calculated that the maximum gross weight was exceeded by 149.6 pounds, and the center of gravity was 2.87 inches aft of the aft limit. The cabin door had been removed for parachuting operations; however, an altered Flight Manual Supplement had been used as authority for the door removal.

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Beech 65 Non-Fatal California, MD June 2, 1991

Posted by on Jun 2, 1991 in 1991, Beech 65 Queen Air, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Multi-Engine, Undetermined | 0 comments

The pilot reported that shortly after takeoff on a parachute jumping flt the left engine lost power, but a second later power was restored. Soon afterwards a total power loss occurred. According to the pilot, the propeller stopped rotating and did not windmill. He did not feather the left propeller. He made a shallow left turn toward an open field, while trying to return to the airport. He was unable to maintain adequate airspeed or altitude, and in order to maintain aircraft control, he reduced power on the right enggine. He made a forced landing in a wheat field. The airplane came to a stop and all occupants escaped the airplane before it caught fire. The examination of the airplane did not disclose evidence of mechanical malfunction. Read the NTSB...

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