Carburetor Icing

C-182A Non-Fatal Plattsburgh, NY July 15, 2006

Posted by on Jul 15, 2006 in 2006, C-182, Carburetor Icing, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, NY, Plattsburgh | 0 comments

According to the pilot of the Cessna 182A, he was returning to land after completing a skydiving drop. The descent, and the downwind and base legs of the traffic pattern were uneventful; however, after turning onto the final leg, the pilot attempted to add power, and the engine “cut out.”

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C-182 Non-Fatal Taylorville, IL July 4, 2001

Posted by on Jul 4, 2001 in 2001, C-182, Carburetor Icing, IL, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, Taylorville | 0 comments

The airplane nosed over in a cornfield during a forced landing after a total loss of engine power. The pilot reported he released the parachutists at 10,100 feet msl over the drop zone and started the descent to the south due to better cloud clearances and to keep clear of company traffic. He reported that he applied carburetor heat before descending.

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C-182 Non-Fatal Midland, TX January 25, 1997

Posted by on Jan 25, 1997 in 1997, C-182, Carburetor Icing, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine | 0 comments

The airplane lost engine power while on final approach for landing, and the pilot performed a forced landing to a unsuitable field which resulted in the airplane coming to rest in the inverted position. The pilot was performing a parachute jumping flight to an altitude of 12,500 feet MSL. During the descent the pilot used carburetor heat, but did not ‘clear’ the airplane’s engine at regular intervals.

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C-182 Non-Fatal Mead, WA May 16, 1991

Posted by on May 16, 1991 in 1991, C-182, Carburetor Icing, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine | 0 comments

At the beginning of a flight for the purpose of dropping parachutists, the pilot reported that everything was normal for the start, taxi, and take off. When the airplane reached an altitude of 150 feet agl, the engine lost power. The pilot set-up for a forced landing in a field with the engine producing partial power and regaining full power, then back to partial power, until touch down. During the landing roll, the airplane collided with a fence. The carburetor icing chart indicates that the flight was being operated in serious icing at cruise and climb power. The pilot had not utilized carburetor heat for the flight. Read the NTSB...

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C-182 Fatal (2) Estacada, OR December 31, 1990

Posted by on Dec 31, 1990 in 1990, 2, C-182, Carburetor Icing, Fatal, Fatal Single-Engine | 0 comments

The engine lost power as the pilot made a power reduction shortly after takeoff. During a forced landing in a christmas tree crop, the airplane stalled about 90 ft agl. Investigation revealed that the muffler cones were missing. Witnesses and the pilot stated that the temperature was 40 deg f and the dew point aprx 36 deg. That combination is within the range favorable to induction system icing. Read the NTSB...

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C-182 Non-Fatal Tekoa, WA June 2, 1990

Posted by on Jun 2, 1990 in 1990, C-182, Carburetor Icing, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine | 0 comments

After completing a parachute drop, the pilot was returning to the airport for landing. The pilot applied carburetor heat while descending to the pattern, but turned it off during the extended down wind. When on short final, the engine suddenly lost power. The pilot was unable to land the airplane on the airport and initiated a forced landing in an open field. During the landing roll, the airplane nosed over. Examination of the engine did not reveal evidence of mechanical failure or malfunction. Read the NTSB...

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C-182 Non-Fatal Elmendorf, TX July 2, 1989

Posted by on Jul 2, 1989 in 1989, C-182, Carburetor Icing, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine | 0 comments

The pilot reported that he detected a loss of power during the desent to land that carburetor heat seemed to correct. He discontinued the carburetor heat after a short period of time and the engine failed on final approach at approximately 500 feet agl. The icing probability chart indicates that existing conditions were conducive for carburetor icing and the spark plugs showed evidence of an over rich condition. The engine ran without problem when installed on another aircraft. Read the NTSB...

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C-182 Non-Fatal Garnett, KS December 3, 1988

Posted by on Dec 3, 1988 in 1988, C-182, Carburetor Icing, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine | 0 comments

Having just made a parachutist’s drop, during a sky diving operation, the private pilot spiraled down from altitude to land, but had to extend his pattern to allow a departing acft to leave. During a long final approach, the engine failed and an emergency landing was attempted in a soft plowed farm field. The acft, on landing, dug in it’s nose wheel and turned over. No mechanical or fuel irregularities were discovered during the post accident investigation and meteorological conditions were favorable for carburetor icing according to the ‘icing probablility charts’. Read the NTSB...

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C-182 Non-Fatal Williston, FL May 28, 1988

Posted by on May 28, 1988 in 1988, C-182, Carburetor Icing, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine | 0 comments

The plt dropped off parachutists at 8,500 ft and began to descend back to arpt. The a/c was descending at 145 mph, 19 inches mp, and 2300 rpm in a long circular pattern. The flt was on final between 500 and 1000 ft msl when the plt tried to apply pwr. The eng failed to respond. After switching the fuel selector and attempting to restart the eng twice, the plt decided to lnd in a field short of the runway. During landing roll, the nose gear broke off and the a/c nosed over. Later the eng was operated to full pwr with no evidence of failure or malfuction. Calculations indicated enough fuel for operation and fuel was found in carb bowl. According to icing probability curves, the a/c was flying in conditions conducive to carb icing. The plt stated that carb heat was not applied during descent. Read the NTSB...

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C-182 Non-Fatal Batesville, MS January 12, 1985

Posted by on Jan 12, 1985 in 1985, C-182, Carburetor Icing, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine | 0 comments

After discharging parachutists at 7500 ft msl the plt closed the throttle and descended to 1200 ft without clearing the engine. No pwr was available when the throttle was advanced upon reaching 1200 ft. A forced landing was made in a bean fld and the acft nosed over after contacting a rut. Environment and power conditions were conductive to carb ice. Read the NTSB...

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