Fuel Exhaustion

PAC 750 Non-Fatal Harvest, AL August 28, 2017

Posted by on Aug 28, 2017 in 2017, AL, Ferry, Fuel Exhaustion, Harvest, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, PAC 750XL, Preflight | 0 comments

The pilot stated that as part of his preflight inspection of the airplane he visually verified each fuel tank was full, and the total usable fuel capacity was 221 gallons. After takeoff, the airplane climbed to the flight planned altitude of 8,000 ft mean sea level (msl), and proceeded towards the destination airport. When the flight was near the planned refueling location of the Rockwood Municipal Airport, Rockwood, Tennessee, the pilot verified that the airplane had an adequate supply of fuel to reach the intended destination. While in contact with HSV air traffic control tower, he requested to descend to 6,000 ft msl, and was subsequently cleared to descend to 4,000 ft msl. At that time, the pilot noted HSV was to his left about 10 miles away. Shortly thereafter, while at an altitude about 3,500 ft msl, warning lights on the annunciator panel, which included a fuel pressure light, illuminated. The pilot declared an emergency with the controller, and the engine experienced a total loss of engine power. According to a Federal Aviation Administration inspector, the controller vectored the pilot to Epps Airpark (00AL), a private airport located in Harvest, Alabama, but the pilot was unable to locate it.

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C182A Non-Fatal San Martin, CA June 24, 2017

Posted by on Jun 24, 2017 in 2017, C-182, CA, Fuel Exhaustion, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, San Martin | 0 comments

The pilot reported that he departed for a parachute jump flight with 12 gallons of fuel onboard. He added that, after the parachute jumpers exited the airplane about 10,500 ft mean sea level (msl), he initiated a left spiraling descent back to the airport. He further added that he “heard and felt the engine start [to] quiet down as if it was shutting down.” He then began to make right descending turns and verified that the fuel selector was in the “both” position. He added that the cylinder head temperature was decreasing, so he switched back to left descending turns and that the “fuel starvation due to banking happened two more times.”

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C-182A Non-Fatal Ovid, NY April 23, 2017

Posted by on Apr 23, 2017 in 2017, C-182, Fuel Exhaustion, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, NY, Ovid | 0 comments

The pilot reported that on the morning of the flight he used a fuel dipstick to check fuel tank quantities prior to his flight. The fuel tank dipstick was marked in the number of skydiving flights and reserve fuel had a mark as well. The right tank showed a higher fuel quantity than the left and when combined, the stick showed enough fuel for three flight loads of jumpers. He further stated that he fueled the airplane up to the “four load” level five days prior to the accident flight, which was the last time the airplane was flown.

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C-182A Non-Fatal Reno, NV May 24, 2016

Posted by on May 24, 2016 in 2016, C-182, Fuel Exhaustion, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, NV, Reno | 0 comments

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, Aviation Safety Inspector that arrived at the scene shortly after the accident, he located the uninjured pilot in command (PIC) and a passenger rated pilot who were the only occupants of the airplane. The inspector reported that the PIC told him that he had fueled the airplane prior to the flight. The PIC told the inspector that he had flown 2.5 hours on the right tank which indicated 3.9 gallons of fuel remained per the electronic fuel quantity indicator, at which time he switched to the left tank which indicated 15 gallons of fuel remained per the electronic fuel quantity indicator.

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C-182A Non-Fatal Geneseo, IL July 2, 2014

Posted by on Jul 2, 2014 in 2014, C-182, Fuel Exhaustion, Geneseo, IL, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine | 0 comments

The pilot was on final approach when the engine started to run out of fuel. She said her boss had a similar problem on a previous flight, and had to correct for it by pitching the nose up and down to force fuel into the fuel lines. The pilot recalled pitching the nose up and down but nothing after that.

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C-182 Non-Fatal Boulder, CO September 1, 2013

Posted by on Sep 1, 2013 in 2013, Boulder, C-182, CO, Fuel Exhaustion, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine | 0 comments

On September 1, 2013, about 1100 mountain daylight time, a Cessna 182 airplane, N6460A, was substantially damaged when the pilot ditched into a lake following a loss of engine power on approach to the Boulder Municipal Airport (BDU), Boulder, Colorado. The pilot sustained minor injuries.

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C-182A Non-Fatal Farmingdale, NJ July 21, 2012

Posted by on Jul 21, 2012 in 2012, C-182, Farmingdale, Fuel Exhaustion, NJ, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine | 0 comments

The pilot was returning to the airport after dropping off parachutists at 9,000 feet. He said that the flight lasted about 30 minutes, and as he turned onto final approach in the traffic pattern, he pulled the throttle back, and the engine lost power. The pilot performed a forced landing in a field, and the airplane struck some power poles lying on the ground, resulting in substantial damage to the airframe.

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C-182 Non-Fatal Watsonville, CA June 24, 2012

Posted by on Jun 24, 2012 in 2012, C-182, CA, Fuel Exhaustion, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, Watsonville | 0 comments

The pilot stated that he departed the airport for the 15-minute skydiving flight with about 20 gallons of fuel onboard. After completing a jump run, he was returning to the airport and maneuvered the airplane on final approach. When the airplane was about 3 miles from the runway and about 1,200 feet above ground level, the engine experienced a partial loss of power.

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C-208 Non-Fatal Mesquite, NV December 17, 2011

Posted by on Dec 17, 2011 in 2011, C-208 Caravan, Fuel Exhaustion, Mesquite, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, NV | 0 comments

Prior to the flight, the pilot fueled the airplane with 16 gallons of jet fuel. He planned to make two local flights carrying skydivers aloft. During the second skydiving flight, he delayed releasing the skydivers due to traffic in the area. As he turned the airplane back toward the drop zone, the airplane’s engine experienced a total loss of power.

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C-182A Non-Fatal Skiatook, OK October 12, 2011

Posted by on Oct 12, 2011 in 2011, C-182, Fuel Exhaustion, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, OK, Skiatook | 0 comments

The pilot reported that he was descending to land after his final flight of the day. The airplane was about 1,500 to 1,700 feet above ground level and about 1.25 miles from the airport when the engine lost total power. The pilot made an emergency landing to an open field, and the airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage.

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C-182 Non-Fatal Dandridge, TN July 30, 2011

Posted by on Jul 30, 2011 in 2011, C-182, Dandridge, Fuel Exhaustion, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, TN | 0 comments

The pilot stated that he fueled the airplane for two flights with skydivers and thirty minutes of reserve fuel. He further stated that during the second approach he had to adjust his intended flight path for other airplane traffic. Then, as the pilot decreased the pitch of the airplane on final approach, the engine sputtered and lost power.

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C-182A Non-Fatal Lesage, WV April 10, 2011

Posted by on Apr 10, 2011 in 2011, C-182, Fuel Exhaustion, Lesage, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, WV | 0 comments

The pilot flew four skydiving flights without refueling. On the last flight, after the skydivers exited the airplane, the pilot initiated a descent and the airplane experienced a total loss of engine power. The pilot knew he could not make it back to the airport and made a forced landing to a gravel area.

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C-182A Non-Fatal Elizabethtown, KY August 30, 2008

Posted by on Aug 30, 2008 in 2008, C-182, Elizabethtown, Fuel Exhaustion, KY, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine | 0 comments

The airplane was fueled before the pilot’s first flight that day. A total of 6.0 gallons of fuel were added to each fuel tank. After fueling, the pilot dipped each fuel tank using the provided dipstick, and determined that each tank contained between 7.0 and 7.5 gallons of usable fuel. He then flew one load of skydivers, returned, and attempted to secure the engine for fueling but was pressured by company personnel that he had enough fuel to make the second flight and that he needed to keep the airplane operating.

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C-182A Non-Fatal Danielson, CT August 27, 2008

Posted by on Aug 27, 2008 in 2008, C-182, CT, Danielson, Fuel Exhaustion, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine | 0 comments

The pilot flew nine skydiving flights on the day of the accident in the Cessna 182A. Each flight was approximately 30 minutes in duration. The airplane was refueled after approximately every other flight with about 12 gallons of fuel. Prior to takeoff for the tenth and final flight of the day, the pilot thought he had about 16 gallons of fuel in the airplane; however, he did not visually confirm how much fuel was in the tanks and could not remember what the fuel gauges indicated.

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C-182 Non-Fatal Aricebo, PR July 25, 2007

Posted by on Jul 25, 2007 in 2007, Aricebo, C-182, Fuel Exhaustion, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, Puerto Rico | 0 comments

The commercial pilot was climbing the airplane with four skydivers aboard when the engine lost power. The pilot told the skydivers to jump when he could not restart the engine, and they all jumped successfully without injury. The pilot made a forced landing short of the departure runway, and the airplane collided with small trees, sustaining substantial damage to the wings and fuselage.

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C-182A Non-Fatal Marstons Mill, MA May 5, 2007

Posted by on May 5, 2007 in 2007, C-182, Fuel Exhaustion, MA, Marstons Mills, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine | 0 comments

The pilot checked the fuel quantity with a wooden stick and estimated 21 gallons of fuel was onboard for the parachute flight. The takeoff and climb to 10,000 feet msl, and release of the jumpers, was normal. On the return to the airport, while on the turn to base leg, the engine lost power.

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C-182A Non-Fatal Star, ID June 25, 2005

Posted by on Jun 25, 2005 in 2005, C-182, Fuel Exhaustion, ID, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, Star | 0 comments

The airplane lost engine power and collided with terrain during the forced landing. Prior to the second flight of the day the pilot fueled the airplane’s right wing with approximately 8 gallons of fuel, bringing the total fuel load for the flight to approximately 20 or 21 gallons. The operator of the skydiving operation said that he instructed his pilots to fuel the aircraft after each flight to 21 gallons for a load of 3 or 4 people, and to 19 gallons for a load of 2 people.

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C-182A Non-Fatal Walterboro, SC July 10, 2004

Posted by on Jul 10, 2004 in 2004, C-182, Fuel Exhaustion, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, SC, Walterboro | 0 comments

The pilot stated that after skydivers exited the aircraft, he began a descent from 10,500 feet msl in the direction of the airport. He stated that upon reaching 2000 feet msl, he enriched the mixture, and the engine lost power. He stated he elected to land on a nearby road. The airplane collided with a pick-up truck and departed the road to the right.

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C-182E Non-Fatal Santa Teresa, NM May 22, 2004

Posted by on May 22, 2004 in 2004, C-182, Fuel Exhaustion, NM, Non-Fatal, Non-Fatal Single-Engine, Santa Teresa | 0 comments

The pilot told an FAA inspector that he had completed an air drop of skydivers at 14,000 feet and was returning to land. During the descent, the engine quit. The pilot initially thought it was due to carburetor ice, but then realized that he ran “out of fuel.” The pilot was forced to land the airplane short of the runway.

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